D.C. community calendar, March 21 to 28, 2013

March 21, 2013
Thursday, MARCH 21

The Building Zone, for age 6 and younger with an adult, activities focusing on the trades within the building-arts community. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays, National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $3. 202-272-2448.

“Professor Wingnut Wants to Fly,” for ages 4-8, Professor Wingnut and Seymour the Seagull find the secrets that make birds and airplanes fly; an interactive musical. 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. Thursday and Friday, National Air and Space Museum, Sixth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Discovery Theater at S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $8; ages 2-16, $6; 1 and younger, $3. 202-633-8700 or www.discoverytheater.org.

Behind the scenes cathedral tour, for age 11 and older; see gargoyles and stained-glass windows and climb a lot of stairs for a panoramic view of the city; take a camera. 10:30 a.m. most weekdays, Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $15. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

Rethinking urban rivers, John R. Wennersten, a Smithsonian consultant on urban waterways, discusses how they fit into local and global public policy. 12:30 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Free, registration required. 202-272-2448.

Scrabble at the Library, for adults, come play and have conversation with real people. 1 p.m. every Thursday, Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-0021.

Take 5! With Corey Wallis and his DUBtet, live jazz and a chance to paint in a temporary studio. 5 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, Kogod Courtyard, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

“The Conservation Legacy of Gifford Pinchot,” documentary film, a conversation follows with V. Alaric Sample, president of the Pinchot Institute for Conservation. 5:30 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, McEvoy Auditorium, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead, performances by a variety of ensembles. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Art display, highlighting the “Japanese eye for beauty,” includes a themed menu, two bar beverages and signature cocktail, for age 21 and older. 6-8 p.m., Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. Members free, nonmembers $25. Register: japaneseeyeforbeauty.eventbrite.com. 202-965-0400.

Remembering Dorothy Height, a panel discussion of the life of the educator and social activist. 6 p.m., Dorothy I. Height/Benning Library, 3935 Benning Rd. NE. Free. 202-281-2583.

Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-1865,” a talk with author James Oakes, 6 p.m. reception in the Visitor Education Center. 6:30 p.m., President Lincoln’s Cottage, 3700 North Capitol St. NW. Reception, $10; lecture, $10, reservations required. 202-829-0436, Ext. 31232 or smiraminy@savingplaces.org.

Jancis Robinson toasts American wines, the co-author of “The Ultimate Companion to the Wines and Wineries of the United States” trades insights and tips in an interview with Washington Post wine columnist Dave McIntyre. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $75. 202-633-3030.

Supersymmetry: The Next Big Discovery?, David Kaplan, Johns Hopkins University department of physics and astronomy, discusses the latest research in space and time, supersymmetry and more. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

OK, I’ve Watched the Film, Now What?” Wildlife filmmaker Chris Palmer shows film clips and moderates a discussion featuring Stephanie Flack, director of the Potomac River Project; Angelica Das, associate director, Center for Social Media; and Vanessa Serrao of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, exploring ways we can turn films into action at both the policy and personal levels. 7 p.m., American University, Wechsler Theater, third floor, Mary Graydon Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.filmmakersforconservation.org.

“Earth Days,” filmmaker Robert Stone introduces his documentary on the modern environmental movement. 7 p.m., National Archives, McGowan Theater, Constitution Avenue and Ninth Street NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

You’re Such a Martyr!, Author Candida Moss discusses the history of persecution in the early Christian church and how exaggerations and forgeries became part of church rhetoric. 7:30 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, Front Nave, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Free, tickets required: invitation@cathedral.org. 202-537-6200.

“Spooky Action at a Distance,” a play about a man studying physics to avoid the draft in 1971; strong language and adult situations. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, Catholic University, Hartke Theatre, Callan Theatre 3801 Harewood Rd. NE. $15; seniors, $10; students, $5. 202-319-5358.

Classical viola recital, Ori Kam performs. 7:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $30. 202-467-4600.

Friday, March 22

Used book sale, most items priced from 25 cents to $1. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Palisades Library, 4901 V St. NW. Free. 202-282-3139.

Morehouse College Glee Club concert, a festive hour of songs and music. Noon, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

“The River,” Pare Lorentz’s 1937 documentary about the misuse of the Mississippi River, presented to mark the 80th anniversary of the New Deal. Noon, National Archives, McGowan Theater, Constitution Avenue and Ninth Street NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Sketching salon, a workshop with Erin Kuykendall, curator of collections, and artifacts from the ceramics collection, instruction and materials provided, no experience necessary. 1-3 p.m., Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. $12. Register: sketchworkshop.eventbrite.com. 202-965-0400.

“Knit and Lit,” informal group of knitters and readers, take a knitting or needlework project to work on as you share patterns and stories. 3 p.m. Saturdays, Georgetown Library, 3307 M St. NW. Free. 202-724-8783.

Ben Williams and the Sound Effect jazz concert, 7 p.m., THEARC, 1901 Mississippi Ave. SE. $10. 202-889-5901 or www.thearcdc.org.

“The Emperor’s New Clothes,” based on the Hans Christian Anderson story of a vain emperor and a set of invisible clothes; audience participation encouraged. 7 p.m., Georgetown University, McNeir Auditorium, 37th and O streets NW. Free. 202-687-2787.

“The Life and Times of Adrian Cowell,” a memorial tribute to the documentary filmmaker’s work in the Amazon, followed by a discussion with Barbara Bramble, National Wildlife Federation; Steve Schwartzman, Environmental Defense Fund; and her daughter, Boojie Cowell. 7 p.m., American University, Wechsler Theater, 3rd Floor, Mary Graydon Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.filmmakersforconservation.org.

Research lecture, Arati Prabhakar, director, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, discusses “DARPA - Creating and Preventing Strategic Surprise,” sponsored by the Philosophical Society of Washington. 8:15 p.m., Cosmos Club, John Wesley Powell Auditorium, 2170 Florida Ave. NW. Free. 703-370-5282.

Saturday, MARCH 23

Construction job fair, a mixed-use project under construction needs workers skilled in mechanical, electrical, plumbing, concrete, rough carpentry, masonry and roofing/waterproofing; take a résuméor other proof of work experience. 9 a.m.-noon, Fort Totten Square, 300 Riggs Rd., NE. Free. Brandon Todd, 202-724-8052.

Native Plants: conserve, cultivate, create, a day-long symposium of lectures, workshops, landscape design projects, innovative regulatory efforts, traditional art forms, inspired garden planning and more. $89, registration required. 202-245-4521 or www.usna.usda.gov.

Mother Goose: Jazz’n Blues!, Christiana Drapkin’s ensemble performs variations of popular children’s tunes. 9:30 and 11 a.m., National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free ticket, one per person, distributed 30 minutes before each show. 202-783-3372.

National Cherry Blossom Festival Family Days, hands-on activities, interactive art demonstrations and performances. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Free. 202-272-2448. www.nbm.org.

Open Minds, a showcase of student innovation with the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., National Museum of American History, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Saul Lilienstein lecture, themed “the German Romantic Opera,” featuring “Fidelio,” “die Freischutz,” and “Lohengrin.” 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. $100. 202-289-1200

“Otter 501,” a documentary about a rescued sea otter pup and the young woman who found him. 10 a.m., Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. Call for ticket price. 202-966-6000 or 202-885-3408.

Learning Japanese culture, theater presentations, origami and more. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, ground floor, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-9203.

Danny Kaye and Sylvia Fine, celebrating the careers of the versatile comedian and his wife; film screenings, a question-and-answer session with their daughter Dena Kaye and a display from the Danny Kaye and Sylvia Fine Collection. 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mary Pickford Theater, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-9994.

Portrait Story Days: Rachel Carson, listen to a story about the environmentalist and create a special piece of art. 1-4 p.m. Saturday, 2-5 p.m. Sunday, National Portrait Gallery, First Floor Education Center, Room E151, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

“Trash Dance,” about choreographer Allison Orr and her plan to teach two dozen sanitation workers to listen, learn and collaborate in a unique dance performance on an abandoned runway with thousands of people watching their garbage truck can “dance.” 1 p.m., Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000.

Pets in the park: Cherry edition, a National Park Service Ranger and a dog leads you and a furry friend on a leash around East Potomac Park and Hains Point to enjoy the sights and sounds of spring. 1-3 p.m., Thomas Jefferson Memorial, 900 Ohio Dr. SW. Free.

Talk Tea with Teaism, celebrate the gift of the cherry trees at a tea party, view a collection of contemporary craft teapots. 1:30 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, Luce Foundation Center, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

“Drought,” a 2011 film about cattle ranchers in northeastern Mexico who hope for much-needed rain, in Spanish with English subtitles. 2 p.m., Mexican Cultural Institute, 2829 16th St. NW. Free. Register: rsvp@instituteofmexicodc.org.

Simple sock knitting, led by Mike Price, experience in knitting, purling, casting on and binding off necessary for this four-week class, experience with circular needles suggested. cludes and readers, take knitting or needlework project to work on as you share patterns and stories. 3 p.m. Saturdays, Georgetown Library, 3307 M St. NW. Free. 202-724-8783.

”Knit and Lit,” informal group of knitters and readers, take knitting or needlework project to work on as you share patterns and stories. 3 p.m. Saturdays, Georgetown Library, 3307 M St. NW. Free. 202-724-8783.

Daughters of the Dust,” a 1991 film about the Gullah culture of the sea islands of South Carolina and Georgia and two pivotal days in the life of the Peazant family. 4:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, East Building Concourse, Auditorium, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-842-6799.

Blacks in Wax, youth from the Southeast Tennis and Learning Center transform entertainers, writers, athletes and others from a wax replica to a live portrayal. 5-6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Hall of States, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

“True Wolf: The Amazing Story of a Wolf called Koani,” with the help of her human companions, a wolf becomes an ambassador for her species, a discussion with filmmakers Chris Palmer and Bruce Weide follows. 7 p.m., American University, Wechsler Theater, third floor, Mary Graydon Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.filmmakersforconservation.org.

Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, violinist Elisabeth Adkins, cellist Igor Zubkovsky and pianist Anna Ouspenskaya perform. 7-9 p.m., Levine School of Music, 2801 Upton St. NW. $20. 202-686-5807.

Piano recital, American University musician-in-residence Yuliya Gorenman performs classical works. 8 p.m., American University, Abramson Family Recital Hall, Katzen Arts Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. $25. 202-885-2787 or auarts@american.edu.

Sunday, MARCH 24

Bonsai basics workshop, for beginners to learn the horticultural, aesthetic and cultural elements of bonsai and apply your new knowledge during the hands-on workshop, all necessary materials, including plant, pot, soil and wire are provided, tools will be available; take a lunch for a noon break. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, March 30, April 13 and 14, U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave. NE. $129. Register: www.usna.usda.gov. 202-245-4521.

Fabergé Egg Family Festival, folk music, a workshop to decorate your own Fabergé-inspired egg and more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Monday, Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. $15; 65 and older, 12; college students, $10; 6 to 18, $5; 5 and younger, free. Register: www.hillwoodmuseum.org . 202-686-5807.

Films of the 2012 Wildscreen Festival, “Saving Rhino Phila,” “Hummingbirds: Jewelled Messengers,” and “Hippos: Nature’s Wild Feast.” Noon-3:30 p.m., National Museum of Natural History, Baird Auditorium, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-885-3408.

Walking tour, a National Park Service Ranger discusses feminism and the dynamics of women’s diversity, family and reproductive rights. 1-3:30 p.m., Sewall-Belmont House, 144 Constitution Ave. NE. Free. Call JoAnn Garcia, 202-329-1641.

Kindlewood in concert, the self-described “dream folk-rock” trio performs. 1:30 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, Luce Foundation Center, third floor, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Classical recital, cellist Amit Peled and pianist Alon Goldstein perform. 2 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $35. 202-785-9727.

Bach’s “St. John Passion,” Michael McCarthy leads the Washington National Cathedral Combined Choirs and Baroque Orchestra and featured soloists. 4 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $25-$80; free garage parking. 202-537-6200.

Lucy Wainwright Roche, the daughter of musicians Loudon Wainwright III and Suzzy Roche performs. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Smithsonian Chamber Music Society, Mark Fewer and Myron Lutzke join Axelrod Quartet members Kenneth Slowik and James Dunham for an evening of Mozart; a 6:30 p.m. lecture by Kenneth Slowik. 7:30 p.m., Smithsonian Castle Commons, 1000 Jefferson Dr. SW. $28. 202-633-3030.

Monday, MARCH 25

Tech Monday, learn basic computer skills including surfing the Web and creating an e-mail account. 2-4 p.m., Northwest One Library, 155 L St. NW. Free. 202-939-5946.

Knitting and crocheting class/club, class meets Mondays. 2:30 p.m.; club meets Fridays. 2:30 p.m., Parklands-Turner Library, 1547 Alabama Ave. SE. Free. 202-645-4532.

The Piano,” Jane Campion’s 1993 film about a mute woman who is sent to New Zealand for an arranged marriage to a wealthy landowner, starring Holly Hunter, Sam Neill, Anna Paquin and Harvey Keitel. 6 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

Mike + Ruthy performance, the multi-instrumentalists and singers perform folk, pop and catchy choruses. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

A Place in the Sun,” the 1951 film about a poor young man determined to win a place in society and the heart of a beautiful socialite, starring Elizabeth Taylor, Montgomery Clift and Shelley Winters. 9:30 p.m., National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free ticket, one per person, distributed 30 minutes before each show. 202-783-3372.

Poetry open mic, read your own works, works by others or just listen. 6:30 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

“American Utopias,” Mike Daisey’s comedy that goes from Disney World to the drug-fueled excesses of Burning Man, to Zuccotti Park, where the Occupy Wall Street movement was born. 8 p.m., Monday-March 30; 7 p.m. March 31; 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays, through April 21, Woolly Mammoth Theatre, 641 D St. NW. Monday-Tuesday, pay-what-you-can; other performances, $35-$67.50, subject to availability. 202-393-3939 or www.woollymammoth.net.

Tuesday, MARCH 26

Get to Know Your Neighborhood, meet advocacy and outreach organization representatives offering free programs in breast cancer support, the Bernice Fonteneau Senior Wellness Center, Lutheran Social Services, the National Council on Aging and others. Noon-2 p.m., Petworth Library, 4200 Kansas Ave. NW. Free. 202-243-1188.

Robert Frost readings, poets Dana Gioia and Eric Pankey celebrate the birthday of the celebrated poet with excerpts of his work and discussing his influence on their writing. Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Whittall Pavilion, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-5394.

Classical music recital, violinist Marlissa del Cid Woods and harpsichordist Elena Tsai perform baroque music. 12:10 p.m., Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. Suggested donation, $5. 202-347-2635, Ext. 20.

Cathedral tour and tea, a docent leads a tour, followed by a traditional English tea with sandwiches and scones; plus a scenic view from the cathedral tower; meet inside the West Front area. 1:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Washington National Cathedral, 3101 Wisconsin Ave. NW. $30, reservations required. 202-537-8993 or www.tea.cathedral.org.

Homework cafe, a quiet place for students in grades kindergarten through 12 to work on homework assignments. 3-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Free. 202-727-1488.

Tippi toes hip-hop dance class, for ages 7 and older; learn choreography and dances. 5:30-6:15 p.m. Tuesdays through May 7, Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. $75 per month plus $30 registration fee. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

North by Northwest,” the 1959 Alfred Hitchcock film about an advertising executive who is mistaken for someone else and kidnapped by a group of international spies, starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason. 6 p.m., Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. Free. 202-727-0232.

“Les Miserables,” a film and musical adaptation of the Victor Hugo story about a petty thief who is hounded by a ruthless police officer in 19th century France, starring Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe and Anne Hathaway. 6 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, Room A-5, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

Choral concert, the Washington Performing Arts Society’s gospel choirs perform an interactive program that celebrates Women’s History Month, with an all-female band. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Gin Dance Company, featuring “City Thoughts,” a work by guest choreographer Constance Walsh. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600..

Bellevue teen chess club, for players of all skill levels. 6 p.m. Tuesdays, William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Library, 115 Atlantic St. SW. Free. 202-243-1184.

Up the Yangtze,” a 2008 film about the river’s transformation with the construction of China’s Three Gorges Dam. 6:30 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. $7; seniors and students, $4. 202-289-1200.

“American Tapestry” author talk, Rachel Swarns discusses First Lady Michelle Obama’s black, white and multiracial ancestors who went from slavery to The White House in five generations. 6:30 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, Room 316, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

Wednesday, MARCH 27

Zoo enrichment day, learn how the animals are kept engaged, happy and healthy. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., National Zoo, 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-633-4888.

Gallery talk, curator Michelle Krowl discusses Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address in “The Civil War in America” exhibit. Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Southwest Gallery, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-9203.

Library of Congress lecture, Stephen Wade discusses his book “The Beautiful Music All Around Us: Field Recordings and the American Experience.” Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Whittall Pavilion, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-5510.

Classical piano recital, Edvinas Minkstimas performs Beethoven’s Concerto No. 2, latecomers not admitted. 12:10 p.m., National Gallery of Art, East Building Concourse, Auditorium, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-842-6941.

Japanese-style Garden Days, garden supervisor Jody Fetzer leads tours of the garden. 2 p.m., Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. $15; 65 and older, $12; 6 to 18, $5; 5 and younger, free. 202-686-5807.

Pageant of the Tsars, exhibition curator Kristen Regina examines the importance of the Romanov coronation albums; come at 5:30 for a mansion tour. Lecture. 6:30 p.m., Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. $15; 65 and older, $12; 6 to 18, $5; 5 and younger, free, Register: www.hillwoodmuseum.org. 202-686-5807.

Gin Dance Company, “City Thoughts,” by guest choreographer Constance Walsh. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Glory, Edward Zwick’s film based on letters by Union Col. Robert Gould Shaw, leader of the all-black 54th Regiment of the Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, starring Morgan Freeman, Matthew Broderick and Denzel Washington. 6:30 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, McEvoy Auditorium, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Authors’ reading, writers Madison Smartt Bell, Edward P. Jones, Jill McCorkle and Ron Rash, and poet Charles Wright read from their works. 6:30 p.m., Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mumford Room, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-5394.

Bauhaus to Harvard: The life and work of Walter Gropius, Isabelle Gournay, a professor at the University of Maryland’s School of Architecture, discusses the Bauhaus design philosophy. 6:45 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. Free. Register: 443-542-2263 or brigittefessenden@comcast.net.

“A Bottle in the Gaza Sea,” about a 17-year-old girl from Paris who gets an e-mail from a mysterious “Gazaman” who found her message of friendship in a bottle floating in the sea, in French, Hebrew and Arabic with English subtitles. 8 p.m., Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. $11; students, $9; seniors, $8.25; age 12 and younger, $8. 202-966-6000.

Thursday, MARCH 21

Chess club, tailored for ages 2 and older. 10 a.m. Thursdays, Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

The gift of the cherry trees, John Malott, U.S. ambassador to Malaysia, discusses the history of the 1912 gift of cherry trees from the city of Tokyo to Washington, D.C. Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Asian Division Reading Room, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-2990.

The Influential women in FDR’s life, a National Park Service Ranger discusses how the former president surrounded himself with strong influential women his entire life. 6 p.m., Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, Ohio Drive NW. Free. Call Paul Maisto, 240-375-6375.

National Portrait Gallery pop quiz, an evening of trivia featuring the most trailblazing, innovative and pioneering women in the gallery’s collection; a top scorer receives a prize at the end of the evening . 6:30 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, Kogod Courtyard Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

— Compiled by Gerri Marmer

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