D.C. community calendar, May 2 to May 9, 2013

May 2, 2013
Thursday, MAY 2

Children’s day/book day, the Maru Montero Dance Company performs Mexican and Latin American folk dances. 1:30 p.m., Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-3080.

“The Ike Age,” Cold War historian William Hitchcock discusses President Eisenhower’s leadership during the 1950s, his impact on today’s world and how his beliefs, ideas and domestic and foreign policies shaped an era for the nation and the world. 4 p.m., Library of Congress, Room 119, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-1421 or 202-707-0213.

Music in Our Schools Month concert, students from Potomac Falls High School Guitar Quartet and Yorktown High School Jazz Band perform. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Making Sense of Scents, Stuart Firestein, Columbia University professor and chairman of the biological sciences department, discusses his research on the olfactory system and the role it plays in perception and memory. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

Evening with a park ranger, a National Park Service ranger leads a tour and discusses the history of the memorials; take water and a flashlight. 7-9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, National World War II Memorial, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-426-6841.

“The Elder Statesman,” Stage Guild performs T.S. Eliot’s final play, about a respected politician who is retiring — when an old friend from his youth turns up with some uncomfortable truths that may bring tragedy or relief. 7:30 p.m. Thursday; regular shows, 8 p.m. Fridays, 2:30 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2:30 p.m. Sundays, continues through May 19, Undercroft Theatre, Massachusetts Avenue and Ninth Street NW. Friday/Saturday evenings, $50; Thursday and matinees, $40; seniors, $10 discount, students, half price. 240-582-0050.

“DC-7: The Roberto Clemente Story,” written and directed by Luis Caballero, a bilingual musical with surtitles about the baseball legend, starring Modesto Lacen, Josean Ortiz and Xiomara Rodriguez. 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays, continues through May 26, GALA Theatre, 3333 14th St. NW. $38, Thursdays and Sundays; $42, Fridays and Saturdays; discounts for seniors, students, military and groups. 202-234-7174 or www.galatheatre.org.

“Other Desert Cities,” a Tony Award-nominated play by Jon Robin Baitz; secrets are unearthed and family tensions fly in this contemporary drama, starring Helen Carey and Larry Bryggman. 8 p.m. Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, continues through May 26, Arena Stage, Fichandler Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW. $40-$85, subject to change and based on availability. 202-488-3300 or www.arenastage.org.

Friday, MaY 3

Cathedral Flower Mart, celebrating the United States, opening ceremony at 10 a.m. Plant sales, floral and horticultural displays, food, white elephant booth, plus activities for children, including rides on the antique carousel, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Performances by choirs, dancers, jazz bands, an orchestra, barber shop quartet and more, puppet show, central tower climb, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Saturday. Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Free; tower climb, $10; other rides, minimal fee. 202-537-6200 or www.allhallowsguild.org/fm.

Potomac Bonsai Festival, demonstrations, hands-on workshops, exhibits, vendors, children’s activities and the collections of the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum. Co-sponsored by the Potomac Bonsai Association and the National Bonsai Foundation. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave. NE. See the Web site for a list of free and fee-based activities. 202-245-4523 or www.potomacbonsai.com/potomacBonsai/index.html

“Dynomite!: Good Times, Bad Times, Our Times – A Memoir,” the actor and comedian discusses his book, co-authored with Sal Manna, about his rise to fame and the tensions on the set of the TV show “Good Times.” Noon, National Archives, Constitution Avenue and Seventh Street NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Pipe organ recital, Norwegian organist Ines Maidre performs works by Bach, Peeter Suda, Guy Bovet and others. 12:15-1 p.m., National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Cir. NW. Free, donations welcome. 202-797-0103.

Library games for teens, try your hand at Tetris, Blokus and Connect4 or join in for “Family Game Show” and other games for Wii, refreshments served. 4 p.m., Rosedale Library, 1701 Gales St. NE. Free. 202-727-5012.

National Symphony Orchestra concert, with music director Christoph Eschenbach and guest violinist Ye Eun Choi. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Lloyd Dobler Effect, a concert of pop hits. 6:30-8:30 p.m., Yards Park, Third and Water streets SE. Free. 202-289-0111 or www.yardspark.org.

Potluck and game night, for all ages, take games to play with family or friends. 7 p.m. Bring a potluck dish for dinner. 6:30 p.m., St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church, Sixth Street and Maine Avenue SW. Free. 202-554-3222 or rector@staugustinesdc.org.

Ceramics workshop, the Empty Bowls Project to benefit SOME (So Others Might Eat); learn to make bowls using coils, press molds and slabs with teaching artist Jeremy Huth; expect to get a little messy, and aprons will be available; throwing wheels are on-site for those with more experience. 7-9 p.m., Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 Seventh St. SE. Free. 202-547-6839 or www.chaw.org .

Jazz concert, pianist Fred Hersh and guitarist Julian Lage perform. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Gallery, 2700 F St. NW. $26-$30. 202-467-4600.

Cornelia Herrmann, classical piano recital, a performance of works by J. S. Bach, Ehrenfellner, Schubert and Beethoven. 7:30 p.m., Embassy of Austria, 3524 International Ct. NW. Free, reservations required. 202-895-6776 or http://www.eventbrite.com/event/6246606769.

Classical piano recital, Cornelia Herrmann performs works by Bach, Schubert and others. 7:30 p.m., Embassy of Austria, 3524 International Ct. NW. Free, reservations required. 202-895-6776 or www.eventbrite.com/event/6246606769.

Orchestra 2001 with soprano Ann Crumb and baritone Patrick Mason, a performance of George Crumb’s “Night of the Four Moons” and “Voices from the Heartland,” and Chaya Czernowin’s “Slow Summer Stay II: Lakes. Come at 6:15 p.m. for a pre-concert talk with Crumb and Czernowin. Concert. 8 p.m., Library of Congress, Coolidge Auditorium, 10 First St. SE. Free tickets available by phone, with a $2.80 service charge per ticket. 202-397-7328 or 202-707-5502.

Saturday, MAY 4

Cathedral Voices sings at Flower Mart, the cathedral’s adult volunteer ensemble performs a program of choral classics including Benjamin Britten’s “Rejoice in the Lamb,” and “Te Deum in C.” 10:30 a.m., Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Free. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

Kids World Cinema: China and Germany, for ages 3-9, several films from China and Germany followed by a related craft activity. 9:15 a.m.-5 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. Free, reservations requested. 202-289-1200.

Brian Curry: magic and mischief, among his feats, Curry makes water vanish in mid-air, then it suddenly drenches a hapless volunteer. 9:30 and 11 a.m., National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free ticket, one per person, distributed 30 minutes before each show. 202-783-3372.

Building the House of God: The Creation of the Gothic Cathedral, art historian Judy Scott Feldman discusses the historical reality in Ken Follett’s novel “The Pillars of the Earth,” a fictional tale of treachery, love and architectural splendor in the tale of the building of one of these structures: Chartres, Beauvais, Salisbury, Cologne and other great European monuments to faith. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $130. 202-633-3030.

A Day with the Pre-Raphaelites, art historian Bonita Billman discusses the English painters, poets and critics who gave birth to the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Everett Millais and William Holman Hunt, in 1848 and wanted to reform art by rejecting what they called the melodramatic and mechanistic style of High Renaissance artists like Raphael. 9:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $130. 202-633-3030.

Space day: “Living and Exploring in Space,” learn about real-life space exploration, meet astronauts Patrick G. Forrester and Thomas K. “T.K.” Mattingly, presentations about spacesuits, the Hubble telescope and more. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., National Air and Space Museum, Sixth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Ukulele workshop, for beginners, age 15 and older, British instrumentalist Con O’Neill teaches the one-day workshop of basic techniques, enabling participants to play several songs. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 Seventh St. SE. $72. 202-547-6839 or www.chaw.org.

Congressional Cemetery Sousa Palooza, music includes marches by John Philip Sousa, spaghetti sauce contests, a lecture by John Philip Sousa IV — “Was Sousa America’s First Rock Star?” — an all-day scavenger hunt and more. Take a picnic lunch. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Congressional Cemetery, 1801 E St. SE. Free. 202-543-0539 or www.congressionalcemetery.org.

Library book sale, including children’s books, novels, cookbooks and mysteries; DVDs also for sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Takoma Park Library, 416 Cedar St. NW. Free. 202-576-7252.

Herb day, staff members talk about the significance of herbs and their many uses in the health, beauty and culinary worlds, demonstrations, activities and information tables. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333.

Appeal of the Persian saruk, collector Colin England discusses the beautiful rugs and carpets from the Arak area of northwest Persia that became favorites of 19th-century collectors. 10:30 a.m., Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. Free. 202-667-0441, Ext. 64.

NSO Teddy Bear concert, for ages 3-5, musicians Aaron Goldman, William Wielgus and Janet Frank tell a story about a bear whose zany collection of hats represents a variety of music from Haydn to Sousa and beyond; come 30 minutes early for “musical playtime.” 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Family Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $18. 202-467-4600.

Wisconsin history, a National Park Service ranger leads bike ride and discusses the amazing connections between Washington, D.C., and the Badger State; take your own bike, water and snacks, helmets required. 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Thomas Jefferson Memorial, 900 Ohio Dr. SW. Free. Call Nathan King, 202-329-7713.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Family Festival, museum-wide events including the opening of a 30-banner exhibition, feature presentations by local writers and a spoken-word artist, and family activities such as arts and crafts, gallery tours, conversations with curators and a scavenger hunt. 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m., National Museum of American History, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Community open house, at Lamb Public Charter School, games, face painting, food, music, a mini-museum and more. Noon-4 p.m., Lamb Public Charter School, 1375 Missouri Ave. NW. Free. 202-726-6200.

Walking with a ranger, a National Park Service ranger explores the memorials. 1-3 p.m., Lincoln Memorial, 23rd Street NW and West Potomac Park. Free. Survey Lodge, 202-426-6841.

Urban gardening workshop, Derek Thomas teaches how to achieve a great garden, pruning with a purpose and what to do when good plants go bad. 1 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free, reservations requested. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

Carducci String Quartet recital, a performance of works by Haydn, Dvorak and Beethoven, 2 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $35. 202-467-4600.

Tree of Life Magnets, create a felt tree of life with simple embroidery stitches and colorful thread. 2-4 p.m., Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. Free. 202-667-0441, Ext. 64.

Show Boat” preview, cast members and the artists from the Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program perform musical highlights. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Liberators of Latin America, a National Park Service ranger leads a walk and discusses the revolutionary ideas that link the memorials to the liberators of Latin America. 6-8 p.m., Foggy Bottom-GWU Metro station, 2301 I St. NW. Free. Mike Balis, 202-438-9710.

Sunday, MAY 5

Cathedral restoration, head stone mason Joseph Alonso, director of preservation and facilities Jim Shepherd and senior director for finance and administration Andrew Hullinger discuss the progress of the restoration since the August 2011 earthquake including the latest inspections of the building’s flying buttresses along the apse and the rolling scaffolding that will be erected above the netting in the nave to inspect the 100 feet high vaulted ceiling. Washington National Cathedral, Front Nave, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Free. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

Pennsylvania Avenue: America’s Main Street, a National Park Service Ranger leads a walk and reveals some of its lesser-known events, places and people. 10:30 a.m., Old Post Office Tower, Benjamin Franklin statue, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-606-8691.

Guided bike ride, about three hours, led by a National Park Service ranger, with stops to discuss the Mall and its memorials; take your own bike, water and snacks, helmets required. 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Thomas Jefferson Memorial, 900 Ohio Dr. SW. Free. Jason Barna, 202-606-8691.

PaikBot family day, a Korean holiday for all ages, visit the Nam June Paik exhibit, participate in activities inspired by his art and more. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, Kogod Courtyard, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Cinco de Mayo Festival, dance and music performances, dancing puppets, traditional arts and crafts for children, Mexican market, food from Latin America, Mexican bingo with prizes and more. Noon-6 p.m., National Mall, outside the Smithsonian Metro station, 1200 Independence Ave. SW. Free. 202-258-5283.

History walk with a National Park Service ranger, explore American history via its memorials and monuments. 1-3 p.m., Lincoln Memorial, Lodge, 23rd Street NW and West Potomac Park. Free. 202-426-6841.

Cathedral tour: service and sacrifice, for age 10 and older, docents discuss iconography in the building’s sculpture, stained glass and needlework that recalls significant events in U.S. history and honors those who have served and sacrificed for their country. 1:30 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, West End Docent Station, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $10. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

Opera scenes concert, musicians from the Washington National Opera’s Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program perform selections from American operas enhanced by the backdrop of American paintings on the walls. 2 p.m., Renwick Gallery, Grand Salon, 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Nurses of Vietnam, a National Park Service Ranger discusses the lives of 10 wartime military nurses whose names appear on the wall. 4 p.m., Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Constitution Avenue and Henry Bacon Drive NW. Free. Natasha Arnold, 202-426-6841.

Beau Soir Ensemble concert, a performance of works by Debussy, Philip Glass, Ian Krouse, Carrie Rose, J. S. Bach Villa-Lobos and Ravel. 5 p.m., Church of the Annunciation, 3810 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free-will offering. 202-441-7678.

”Remembering the Holocaust” walking tour, a National Park Service ranger discusses the thanks owed to World War II veterans. 6-8 p.m., National World War II Memorial, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. Call Lowell Fry, 202-438-9603.

Broadway classics, students in the University of Maryland Musical Theatre Workshop perform a cabaret of classic Broadway tunes by Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Leonard Bernstein and others. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

National Gallery of Art Orchestra, with pianist and guest conductor Paul Badura-Skoda, a performance of works by Mozart. Latecomers not admitted. 6:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, West Building Garden Court, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-842-6941.

Smithsonian Chamber Music Society: Masterworks of Three Centuries, a performance of works by Dohnanyi, Beethoven and Purcell, come at 6:30 for artistic director Kenneth Slowik’s pre-concert talk. Concert. 7:30 p.m., National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. $28. 202-633-3030.

Monday, MAY 6

U.S. Botanic Garden lunchtime tour, volunteers lead a tour of plants and discuss what manila folders, Chanel No. 5, vanilla and fossil fuels have in common; a discussion of possible breakthroughs in medicinal plant research. Noon through May 20 and Wednesdays through May 29, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333.

Traditional European music, performance by Belgian instrumentalist Paul Oorts and his wife, Karen Ashbrook, a hammered dulcimer and wooden flute artist. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Four Score and Four Years: From the Civil War to World War II, a National Park Service ranger leads a walking tour to the memorials that mark three deadly conflicts and how they are related. 6-8 p.m., Lincoln Memorial, 23rd Street NW and West Potomac Park. Free. Call Lowell Fry, 202-438-9603.

The Misfits,” John Huston’s 1961 film about a divorced and disillusioned woman who befriends an aging cowboy, a rodeo rider and a heartbroken mechanic, starring Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe, Montgomery Clift, Eli Wallach and Thelma Ritter. 6:30 p.m., National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free ticket, one per person, distributed 30 minutes before each show. 202-783-3372.

The Just Right Home, designer and author Marianne Cusato discusses the variables that influence the decisions we make for our homes and communities in an effort to balance the function, cost and delight of where we live. 6:30 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $20; students, $12. 202-272-2448. www.nbm.org.

Jules and Jim,” Francois Truffaut’s 1962 film, set in pre-World War I Paris, about two friends who fall in love with the same woman, in French, English, German with English subtitles. 6:30 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. $7; seniors and students, $4. 202-289-1200.

District of Columbia Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation, with a reception. Ceremony, 7 p.m., National Academy of Sciences, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW. Registration: www.dcpreservation.org/events. 202-783-5144.

Native Guard,” poet laureate Natasha Trethewey reads from her Pulitzer Prize-winning collection of poems and gives an interpretation of the Native Guard, one of the first all-black regiments to fight in the Union Army. 7 p.m., National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Tuesday, MAY 7

Bill’s buddies performance workshop, for students in grades 3 to 12, an ensemble of professional Folger actors performs samplers from Shakespeare’s plays and an educational workshop that brings his plays to life in a ddynamic and interactive way. 10 a.m., Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. $15. 202-675-0336.

Historic and growing: the Tudor Place landscape, led by a docent across 5.5 acres with stops to discuss how orchards, vegetable gardens, stables and grazing land made way for lawns, rose gardens, fountains and more. 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. $10, registration encouraged. 202-965-0400 or http://tudorplacehistoricandgrowing.eventbrite.com/.

“The Princess, the Pig and the Dragon with Hua Hua Zhang,” for ages 4-8, the master puppeteer weaves cross-cultural tales using traditional string, rod and hand puppets. 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday through May 10, Discovery Theater at S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $8; ages 2-16, $6; 1 and younger, $3. 202-633-8700 or www.discoverytheater.org.

Washington Bach Consort , J. Reilly Lewis leads a performance of works by Bach, including an organ piece performed by William Neil. 12:10 p.m., Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. Suggested donation, $10. 202-347-2635, Ext. 20.

Cathedral tour and tea, docents lead an hour-long tour of “Women in Glass and Stone” in the building’s Gothic architecture and art, followed by a traditional English tea. 1:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Washington National Cathedral, West End Docent Station, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $30. 202-537-5581 or www.allhallowsguild.org/what/tourtea_about.html.

Traditional Irish dance music, performance by the Old Bay Ceili Band. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

V-E Day, a National Park Service Ranger discusses how Europe recognizes “Victory in Europe” day since May 7, 1945. 6 p.m., National World War II Memorial, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. Call Paul O’Brian, 202-438-7066.

Ian MacKaye and his music,the co-founder of Dischord Records discusses the music that has come from the Washington, D.C., underground for the past 30 years. 6 p.m., Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mumford Room, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-1120.

Author talk, Henry J. Sienkiewicz reads from his book Untangled: Contemplation and Entanglement,” which encourages the reader to use contemplation to deal with life’s complexities. 7 p.m., Arts Club of Washington, 2017 I St. NW. Free. 202-331-7282, Ext. 3, or www.artsclubofwashington.org.

Lecture and concert, art historian Alice Jarrard discusses Albrecht Durer’s relationship to Italy and his reimagining of the Italian Renaissance in the late 19th century, and is accompanied by Capella de la Torre, a German ensemble known for its performances with historical double-reed instruments. 7 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. Free. Register: www.iicwashington.esteri.it. 202-289-1200.

Wednesday, MAY 8

Happy Birthday, Harry (Truman), celebrate the birthday of our 33rd president, “Give ‘em H*** Harry,” with a ranger-guided walk through the National Mall. 10-11:30 a.m. and 2-3:30 p.m., National World War II Memorial, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. Ted White, 202-657-8453.

Gallery talk, Jennifer Harbster discusses the role of technology in the Civil War. Noon, Library of Congress, Southwest Gallery, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-9203.

The Quest for “New” in Spanish-American culture, scholar Victor Goldgel discusses fashion and newspapers in the 19th century. Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Whittall Pavilion, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-3302.

Noontime classical music concert, harpsichordist Ignacio Prego performs works by Scarlatti and Spanish composers. 12:10 p.m., National Gallery of Art, West Building Ground Floor, Lecture Hall, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-842-6941.

American flag folding, a museum staff member teaches visitors how to fold a full-size replica of the banner in Flag Hall. 2:30 p.m. most Wednesdays-Saturdays, National Museum of American History, Second Floor Center, Flag Hall, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Washington from high above, a National Park Service ranger discusses how the capital’s geography, architecture and history come together, learn how the tower came to be and how it survives over a century later. 3:30 p.m., Old Post Office Tower, Observation Deck, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-606-8691.

Students in concert, students from the Levine School of Music perform. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Rethinking nature, ecologist Daniel Botkin, author of “The Moon in the Nautilus Shell: Discordant Harmonies Reconsidered,” discusses governmental policies based on an outdated view of our world. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $25. 202-633-3030.

“Matchmaking Mayor,” a documentary film about the small East Slovak village of Zemplinske Hamre, the peculiar population crisis it faces with the older generation slowly dying out and leaving the village overrun with 30-something singletons who show no signs of “restocking” the community, in Slovak with English subtitles. 8 p.m., Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. $11; students, $9; seniors, $8.25; age 12 and younger, $8. 202-966-6000.

Thursday, MAY 9

A. Philip Randolph and the proposed 1941 march on Washington, a National Park Service ranger discusses the influence of the civil rights and American labor movement leader and tells why the march never happened. 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, West Potomac Park, between the Lincoln and Jefferson memorials, Independence Avenue SW. Free. Call John Huppert, 202-233-3520.

Is “This” art? discussion, a gallery talk of free-flowing conversation and debate on modern and contemporary art. Noon, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Lincoln Gallery, Third Floor Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

The Collectivization and Holodomor Chronicle Project: Liudmyla Hrynevych discusses her book, “The Unknown Famine of 1928-1929,”; Vladyslav Hrynevych discusses his new monograph titled “Unbridled Dissonance: The Second World War and Socio-political Attitudes in Ukraine, 1939-1941.” Noon, Library of Congress, European Division Reading Room, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-4371.

Art signs: gallery talk, a volunteer gallery guide leads conversations about artworks in American Sign Language. 5:30 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, F Street Lobby, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. E-mail wilsoncl@si.edu or 202-633-1000.

U.S. Army Band concert, Pershing’s Own performs. 6 p.m., National World War II Memorial, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-399-7993.

Envisioning a new information economy, digital pioneer Jaron Lanier discusses his book “Who Owns the Future?” with Ron Rosenbaum, author of “What Turned Jaron Lanier Against the Web?” 6:45 p.m., U.S. Navy Memorial, Naval Heritage Center, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. $42. 202-633-3030 or www.smithsonianassociates.org.

Keeping it Real in the White House: How Presidents Stay Connected, Kenneth T. Walsh, senior White House correspondent for U.S. News & World Report and author of “Prisoners of the White House: The Isolation of America’s Presidents and the Crisis of Leadership,” and other experts share anecdotes about how presidents try to find normalcy in an abnormal environment. 6:45 p.m., National Museum of Natural History, Baird Auditorium, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. $25. 202-633-3030.

Current events talk, Bill Press talks with Norman Ornstein of the American Enterprise Institute and Thomas Mann of the Brookings Institution, who offer insight into topics and issues of the day. 7 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free, reservations requested. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

— Compiled by Gerri Marmer

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