Education digest: Latino career conference; more states delay Common Core testing

December 1, 2013
arlington county
Latino conference focuses on careers

Latino students from across Arlington County got to glimpse potential future careers at a recent leadership conference at George Mason University.

About 200 students spent the day on the campus and met with Latino professionals, who talked about how they pursued their educations and jobs.

GMU President Angel Cabrera, a native of Spain, encouraged students to think without limits about their futures and to improve their chances of getting a good job by pursuing higher education. He said that being bilingual and bicultural in an increasingly diverse country is an advantage.

The 21st annual leadership conference was coordinated by the Latin American Student Congress, representing all three Arlington high schools.

The event was conducted in Spanish, offering students a chance to communicate in their native tongue at school, said Francesca Reilly-McDonnell, who oversees programs for English-language learners.

She said the goal is to “honor their culture and language” and to help students feel comfortable.

Latino students make up the largest minority group in Arlington public schools, with
28 percent of the enrollment.

— Michael Alison Chandler

The Nation
More states delay Common Core testing

Massachusetts and Louisiana have decided to delay the implementation of standardized tests aligned to the Common Core State Standards in the face of growing concern about them.

The two states follow nearly 10 others — including Florida, the pioneer of corporate-influenced school reform — to slow or rethink Common Core implementation as a growing number of educators and parents have become skeptical. The initiative is a set of standards adopted by 45 states and the District of Columbia designed to raise student achievement, and the Obama administration has been defending it amid rising concern.

— Valerie Strauss

2,574

The number of University of Virginia undergraduates who were from Fairfax County in 2012. Fairfax had the state’s largest contingent of ­­
U-Va. undergraduates. Loudoun County was second, with 602. Prince William County had 416, while Arlington County had 255. There were 216 from Alexandria.

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