Gansler ad: Maryland leaders should cut wasteful spending before adding new taxes

In his latest television ad, Maryland Democratic gubernatorial hopeful Douglas Gansler criticizes the state’s leaders for adding new taxes as the state struggled through difficult economic times.

“To weather the recession, President Obama cut middle class taxes,” Gansler says in the 30-second ad, which is airing in the Washington and Baltimore markets. A similar radio ad will also run in the Washington region. “But in the past eight years, Maryland raised middle class taxes. Forty new taxes, costing jobs, squeezing families.”

Maryland democratic gubernatorial hopeful Douglas Gansler criticizes the state’s leaders for adding new taxes as the state struggled through difficult economic times. (YouTube: Doug Gansler)

Gansler, who is Maryland’s attorney general, has proposed cutting $1.5 billion from the state budget by reforming the state’s procurement process, lowering the jailed population, ending some tax credits, closing some loopholes that benefit corporations, collecting unpaid tolls and finding other efficiencies.

That savings would then go toward expanding access to pre-Kindergarten classes, merit pay for teachers, college scholarships and job training — programs that Gansler says will help the state’s middle class. He said these changes will come without new taxes.

Meanwhile, Gansler’s chief primary rival, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown (D), debuted a new ad Tuesday that highlights his plans for job creation and investing in the state’s infrastructure.

“This is a great state, and it should be great for every family, in every community,” Brown says in the 30-second spot, which includes shots of him touring small businesses and manufacturing plants, as well as the skyline of downtown Baltimore.

Brown’s ad also touts his endorsement by The Washington Post editorial page.

Jenna Johnson writes about Maryland politics, including the General Assembly, the administration of Gov. Martin O'Malley and the 2014 election.
John Wagner has covered Maryland government and politics for The Post since 2004.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Local