Michael Triplett, journalist

January 21, 2013

Correction: The obituary for journalist Michael Triplett omitted a surviving partner, John “Jack” Squier of Arlington County.

Michael Triplett, 48, a Washington-based business journalist who had been president of the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association, died Jan. 17 at his mother’s home in Madison, Ala. He had cancer.

His mother, Shirley Triplett, confirmed the death.

At his death, Mr. Triplett was an assistant managing editor for the Daily Tax Report at Bloomberg BNA.

He had spent about 12 years at the Bureau of National Affairs, a news service that provides legal, tax, business and government information. Bloomberg L.P. acquired BNA in 2011.

In 2006, Mr. Triplett won a National Press Club award for his examination of the new terrain of employment and labor law issues affecting laborers in the video game industry.

In August 2012, he became president of the National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association. Earlier, he was Washington chapter president and vice president of print and new media.

He was credited with playing a key role in the organization’s decision to join the minority journalists group Unity in 2011. He was one of the gay and lesbian group’s first representatives to the Unity board.

Michael Ray Triplett was born in St Louis and raised in St. Charles, Mo. He was a 1986 journalism and political science graduate of the University of Missouri, where he also received a master’s degree in education in 1989. He was a 1998 graduate of American University’s law school and was an adjunct professor there until 2011.

Among other jobs before entering journalism, he was a residence hall director at the University of Kansas at Lawrence and Ohio State University and a paralegal advocate at Legal Services of Northern Virginia.

He was an Arlington resident and had been parish council president at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Washington.

Besides his mother, survivors include his partner of three years, John “Jack” Squier of Arlington County; and a sister.

Adam Bernstein

Adam Bernstein has spent his career putting the "post" in Washington Post, first as an obituary writer and then as editor. The American Society of Newspaper Editors recognized Bernstein’s ability to exhume “the small details and anecdotes that get at the essence of the person” and to write stories that are “complex yet stylish.”