William A. McClellan, IRS branch chief

December 5, 2012

William A. McClellan, 91, a certified public accountant who became a branch chief with the Internal Revenue Service, died Nov. 10 at his home in Laurel. He had congestive heart failure.

His death was confirmed by a son, Paul McClellan.

Mr. McClellan worked at the IRS for 36 years, retiring in 1979 as chief of the special services branch of the appellate division.

During that time as well as after his IRS retirement, Mr. McClellan worked part time at Benjamin Franklin University (now part of George Washington University) as a teacher and then dean of the graduate school. He served on the Benjamin Franklin University board of governors from 1986 to 2005 and was a past president of the university’s alumni association.

After retiring from the IRS, he did consulting work as an expert witness on tax valuations in the U.S. Tax Court and U.S. district courts.

William Alfred McClellan was born in New York and raised in Washington, where he graduated from Roosevelt High School. He was a 1941 commercial science graduate of Benjamin Franklin, and in 1956 he received a second bachelor’s degree, in economics, from George Washington.

During World War II, he served in the Navy in the Pacific aboard the aircraft carrier Franklin, which sustained heavy bombing damage from Japanese planes. His decorations included the Bronze Star.

He was a member of St. Nicholas Catholic Church in Laurel, where he was a lector and past chairman of the parish finance council. He received an award from the Catholic Archdiocese of Washington for his church service.

His wife of 62 years, the former Ruth Prangley, died in 2006.

Survivors include nine children, William J. McClellan of Silver Spring, Paul J. McClellan of The Villages, Fla., Kevin P. McClellan of Bowie, Brian E. McClellan and Ruthanne Huffman, both of Laurel, John M. McClellan of Fairfax County, Therese Doyle of Ellicott City, Melinda Hamilton of Jessup and Daniel McClellan of Gambrills; 26 grandchildren; and 24 great-grandchildren.

— Adam Bernstein