Cuccinelli closes investigation of voter fraud allegations against congressman’s son

Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli says he will not charge the son of Rep. James P. Moran Jr. (D-Va.) in connection with possible voter fraud allegations that surfaced last fall during his father’s bid for reelection.

Cuccinelli said Friday that his office’s investigation into the matter involving Patrick Moran has been closed. The Arlington Police Department announced Thursday that it would not be charging Moran.

The latest on Virginia politics

Clear leaders emerge in primary races in Northern Virginia, finance reports show

Clear leaders emerge in primary races in Northern Virginia, finance reports show

Republican Barbara Comstock in the 10th District and Democrat Don Beyer in the 8th District are ahead.

Va. Republicans aren’t blinking in Medicaid showdown

Va. Republicans aren’t blinking in Medicaid showdown

Although expansion of coverage is backed by some important donors, GOP lawmakers maintain opposition.

In 10th District debate, GOP hopefuls target front-runner

Six Virginians depict themselves as the conservative heirs to retiring U.S. Rep. Frank Wolf.

Read more

The attorney general worked with the Arlington police and Arlington County commonwealth’s attorney to investigate the incident. Arlington authorities opened the investigation in October after a video was released depicting Patrick Moran, former director of field operations for the Jim Moran for Congress campaign organization, discussing possible voter fraud with an activist posing as a campaign worker for his father.

Cuccinelli said in a statement that Moran’s behavior was “inappropriate” but not illegal. He said Moran and the Jim Moran for Congress campaign cooperated fully with the investigation.

Cuccinelli said that despite repeated attempts to involve the party responsible for producing the video, they “failed to provide any assistance.”

Michael Madigan, attorney for conservative activist James O’Keefe, who posted the video Oct. 8, denied Friday that O’Keefe had been uncooperative.

“The police were offered the complete unedited video, which they never followed up with upon receiving,” Madigan said. “James is not in the business of trying to send people to jail. It’s up to the criminal authorities to determine whether there is criminal intent or whether a particular statute was violated.”

Allison Klein contributed to this report.

 
Read what others are saying

    Man killed in Loudoun crash