Virginia State Sen. Creigh Deeds: His family and political highlights

Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post - Creigh Deeds is seen while he was a Virginia gubernatorial Democratic candidate in 2009.

Party: Democrat

Current Office: State senator representing Bath County and surrounding areas, including the city of Charlottesville.

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Va. State Sen. Creigh Deeds: Family and political highlights

Va. State Sen. Creigh Deeds: Family and political highlights

Deeds represents Bath County and surrounding areas, including the city of Charlottesville.

2009: Deeds an underdog with a history of beating the odds

2009: Deeds an underdog with a history of beating the odds

ARCHIVES | Deeds was 12 when a farm truck rolled down a hill, killing two children and injuring several more – including Deeds.

Born: Richmond

Age: 55

Education: Concord College (B.A., 1980), Wake Forest University School of Law (J.D., 1984)

Family: He and his first wife, Pam Deeds, divorced in 2010 after nearly three decades of marriage. Deeds married his current wife, Siobhan, in 2012. Four children.

Religion: Presbyterian

Pivotal Political Moments

1987: At age 29, defeated an incumbent to be elected commonwealth’s attorney of Bath County.

1991: Elected to the first of five terms in the House of Delegates.

1998: Sponsored Megan’s Law, which required the Virginia State Police to track sex offenders and publicize their location.

1999: Sponsored legislation that resulted in an amendment to Virginia’s constitution protecting the right to hunt and fish; sponsored bill creating the state’s preservation land tax credit.

2001: Elected to the state Senate in a special election, filling the seat of Charlottesville senator Emily Couric, who died that year of pancreatic cancer.

2005: Ran for attorney general, losing to Republican Robert F. McDonnell by 360 votes, the closest margin for a statewide race in Virginia history.

2009: Ran for governor, losing to Gov. Robert. F. McDonnell by 17 points.

 
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