Marie Arana
Marie Arana
Reporter

Marie Arana is a former editor in chief of Book World at The Washington Post. Currently, she is a Writer at Large for The Post and a member of the Scholars Council at the Library of Congress. Arana is the author of a memoir about her bicultural childhood “American Chica,” which was a finalist for the 2001 National Book Award as well as the PEN/Memoir Award, and won the Books for a Better Life Award. She is the editor of a collection of Washington Post essays about the writer’s craft, “The Writing Life: How Writers Think and Work,” which is used as a textbook for writing courses in universities across the country. Her novel “Cellophane,” about the Peruvian Amazon, was a finalist for the John Sargent Prize. Her most recent novel is “Lima Nights.” She has chaired juries for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Awards, organized literary conferences for the Kennedy Center, and currently sits on the board of the National Book Festival. She has also been an active spokesperson on Latin America, Hispanic Americans and biculturalism. Currently, she is at work on a biography of Simón Bolívar, which is on contract with Simon & Schuster.

Latest by Marie Arana

‘Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage’

‘Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage’

Haruki Murakami’s new coming-of-age story takes us into a fractured modernity and its uneasy inhabitants.

‘Lucky Us,’ by Amy Bloom, America’s Victor Hugo

‘Lucky Us,’ by Amy Bloom, America’s Victor Hugo

A bustling tale of American reinvention, with two half-sisters toiling to reverse their fortunes.

‘The Book of Unknown Americans,’ by Cristina Henríquez

A story of coming to the United States — and a ringing paean to love.

‘The Temporary Gentleman,’ by Sebastian Barry

With the war long over, an Irishman in Africa sets down the harrowing story of his past.