Michael Sallah
Reporter

Michael Sallah joined The Washington Post’s investigations unit in 2012 after working at The Miami Herald seven years as an investigations editor and reporter.  Michael was named a Pulitzer finalist for meritorious public service his final year at The Herald for stories that uncovered wretched and deadly conditions in Florida’s assisted living facilities, which led to the shutdown of some of the state’s largest homes. As a team leader, he oversaw an investigation into public housing corruption that won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for local reporting.

As a reporter in 2004, Michael was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting while working at The Toledo Blade for stories that uncovered the longest war crimes case of the Vietnam War and subsequent cover up by the Pentagon. The series, Buried Secrets, Brutal Truths, also won the IRE Medal, Sigma Delta Chi and a Nieman Foundation award.

Michael grew up in Ohio, and spent most of his professional career in South Florida. He has been an adjunct professor at the University of Miami graduate school and Barry University in Miami. He is a journalism graduate of The University of Toledo.

Latest by Michael Sallah

Innocent motorists caught in seizures face fights with feds

Innocent motorists caught in seizures face fights with feds

STOP AND SEIZE | Motorists are being stopped by police and sometimes having thousands of dollars in cash confiscated. The fight to get the cash returned can be involved and costly.

Police training firm helps fuel rise in U.S. cash seizures

Police training firm helps fuel rise in U.S. cash seizures

Started by a California highway patrolman, Desert Snow teaches the art of “highway interdiction.”

Police use intel network in cash seizures on U.S. highways

Police use intel network in cash seizures on U.S. highways

Aggressive policing to target money from motorists in civil seizures is underwritten by federal funding.

Bill would protect D.C. homeowners from tax lien investors

Bill would protect D.C. homeowners from tax lien investors

D.C. leaders propose some of the strongest protections in the nation for homeowners facing tax sales.