N.Y., N.J. unveil new Ebola precautions

N.Y. and N.J. governors address Ebola outbreak. (AP)

Medical personnel returning to the region from West Africa will be automatically quarantined if they had direct contact with an infected person. The new policy was announced a day after a physician in New York City tested positive for the deadly virus.

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Two dead in school shooting near Seattle

The shooter, himself a student at the high school in Marysville, Wash, opened fire in the cafeteria before taking his own life; authorities say they are confident he was acting alone.

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Religion events from around the Washington area

Church bazaars and festivals, coat drive, Vienna Boys Choir concerts, choral Evensong, tulips, yoga, Zumba.

Fairfax’s later start times for high schools may set a trend

Fairfax’s later start times for high schools may set a trend

The county will open 25 schools later to give students more sleep while others in the nation study the issue.

GOP ramps up outreach in U.S. minority communities

GOP ramps up outreach in U.S. minority communities

Girding for 2016, party leaders see an opening to actively court black voters who have rebuffed previous efforts.

Nurses need gear to care for Ebola patients

Nurses need gear to care for Ebola patients

Nurses put themselves at risk by caring for Ebola patients -- now they want support from Congress for mandated protocols.

Iraqi Kurdish fighters expected to exit Turkey for Syria

About 200 pesh merga fighters could cross the border to aid the town of Kobane within days.

Survey: Federal employees unhappy with senior leaders

A survey of the federal workforce shows dissatisfaction with senior leadership, discontent overall.

A comedian walks into the Senate
— and there’s no punch line

A comedian walks into the Senate <br>— and there’s no punch line

Terrified of making mistakes, political candidates like Sen. Al Franken are tactically turning boredom into a campaign virtue.

Body found in Va. is confirmed
as U-Va. student Hannah Graham’s

Body found in Va. is confirmed <br>as U-Va. student Hannah Graham’s

The news ends part of the mystery surrounding the sophomore, who went missing Sept. 13.

25 euro-area lenders fail stress test, ECB report says

A roundup of business news from around the world.

Student kills one, injures four, then kills himself in Wash.

Deadly incident occurred in a high school cafeteria in the Seattle area.

Federal workers’ satisfaction with senior leaders falls to 5-year low

Federal workers’ satisfaction with senior leaders falls to 5-year low

A government survey found that morale plummeted a year after the shutdown and furloughs.

DOJ inquiry on Pr. William school leads to new boundaries

County officials redraw the map to increase the number of minority students at a high school.

Podcast: Francis Collins on leadership

The director of the National Institutes of Health talks about the art of leading scientists.

8 things you didn’t read today (but should have)

8 things you didn’t read today (but should have)

Best hair, Supreme Court haiku and the latest from the campaign trail.

Is Libya a proxy war?

Is Libya a proxy war?

A dangerous scenario looms ahead in Libya with an ongoing, multi-faceted struggle that is only partially understood.

With Martha Coakley, deep-blue Massachusetts continues to be a headache for Democrats

With Martha Coakley, deep-blue Massachusetts continues to be a headache for Democrats

The GOP has actually been in the ballgame for each of the last four major statewide campaigns.

Seven takeaways of the Vatican synod on family life

A two-week summit ended without a consensus on some hot-button topics. Where does that leave the papacy and the church?

Philadelphia archbishop ‘very disturbed’ after summit

Archbishop Charles Chaput said the debate over gays and remarried Catholics sent a confusing message.

Coeur d’Alene apparently changes stance, agrees that for-profit chapel need not perform same-sex weddings

The ordinance’s exemption for “religious corporations,” the City Attorney now concludes, applies to for-profit corporations as well as nonprofit ones.

Joni Ernst skipped an editorial board meeting. That was probably smart.

Joni Ernst skipped an editorial board meeting. That was probably smart.

Good for candidates. Bad for democracy.

U.S. paying $3.6 million to upgrade TV sports coverage in Afghanistan

U.S. paying $3.6 million to upgrade TV sports coverage in Afghanistan

An inspector general is questioning a $3.6 million contract for TV trucks to cover Afghan sports, including horseback goat-hauling matches and cricket.

Why watching grass grow might actually be a good investment of federal money

Why watching grass grow might actually be a good investment of federal money

Take Tom Coburn’s “Wastebook” with a grain of salt.

QUIZ: Which Senate race are you?

QUIZ: Which Senate race are you?

Forget polls. There is only one way to learn which electoral contest understands your soul.

Five myths about black voters

Five myths about black voters

A primer for the next 11 days.

First Amendment vs. freedom of information law

Applicable to the Second Amendment?

Could non-citizens decide the November election?

Could non-citizens decide the November election?

New research finds that non-citizens do vote, and this could be consequential in some races.

Jerry Brown thinks California’s big cities should have strong mayor form of government

Jerry Brown thinks California’s big cities should have strong mayor form of government

More than $1.5 million has been spent on a measure to give Sacramento’s mayor more authority.

Congress expresses doubt about U.S. Ebola precautions

Lawmakers say government steps to handle the disease have been inconsistent and inadequate.

A sampling of Supreme Court decisions as haiku

Keith Jaasma, who created Supreme Court Haiku, picked the following poems as his favorites.

Anti-abortion lobby pitches new group: Democratic women

The experiment by the Susan B. Anthony List is being tried in the tight Iowa Senate race.

The technology Elon Musk fears

The technology Elon Musk fears

Tesla’s CEO warns that artificial intelligence is likely mankind’s biggest threat.

How Ebola panic could hurt civil liberties

How Ebola panic could hurt civil liberties

Ebola is frightening Americans. We know from past research that when Americans are worried about infectious diseases, they trust medical experts more, and are more likely to temporarily give up civil liberties.

House lawmaker questions asset forfeiture program

Rep. Sensenbrenner said the “implications on civil liberties are dire” in a letter to the attorney general.

McCain to new VA Secretary: Hurry up and fire people already

“[W]e are dismayed to learn that senior leaders of the VA are still not being held accountable for their grievous misconduct,” wrote McCain and Flake.

Forecasting the Brazilian election

Forecasting the Brazilian election

Polls in the first round systematically overestimated support for Roussef and underestimated support for Neves, but there is interesting variation across polls.

How demographics can (basically) predict what will happen in November

How demographics can (basically) predict what will happen in November

A look at demographic details from a series of recent polls.

Jerry Brown spending more on initiatives than his own race

Jerry Brown spending more on initiatives than his own race

The California governor is cruising to a fourth term. He’s so far ahead he won’t be advertising on his own behalf.

The top skills people list on their LinkedIn profiles, mapped out by city

The top skills people list on their LinkedIn profiles, mapped out by city

Finance is a top skill in New York City, while it’s mining in Las Vegas, and SEO marketing in Provo, Utah.

The different leadership styles of D.C.’s mayoral candidates

The different leadership styles of D.C.’s mayoral candidates

A look at how Muriel Bowser, David Catania and Carol Schwartz think about leadership.