Web videos address questions on sex, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases


Trojan web videos answer more than 100 questions about sex, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases and pleasure. (William B. Plowman/GETTY IMAGES)
VIDEO SERIES
All about condoms: Trojan sponsors Q&As
(HealthGuru.com)

How do I use a condom? How do I pick a size? What do I do if it breaks? If condoms have you stumped, a new series of Web videos sponsored by Trojan is out to help. The iconic brand, which began selling condoms in the United States in 1927 in a pharmacist trade magazine, is going digital this summer. In a partnership with HealthGuru.com, Trojan videos tackle more than 100 questions about sex, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases and pleasure. Sexperts Logan Levkoff and Harry Fisch answer queries such as “What is a female condom?”, “How do I know if I’m allergic?” and “What is herpes?” The site isn’t restricted and doesn’t require registration, which means that Web users of all ages can learn about “Getting It On (The Condom, That Is),” for example, and submit ideas for future Q&As. Warning: The videos aren’t graphic, but images of condoms, condom wrappers, swooning adults and bananas push them over the PG-13 edge.

HEALTH QUIZ
Checkups without a co-pay
(Fitness, July/August)

How healthy are you? This month, the editors of Fitness magazine offer 10 “self-check” questions that can help you identify your health risks without setting foot in a doctor’s office. The quiz is chock-full of cheesy one-liners — “Belly blubber is a time bomb” and “Word games help train your brain” — but it also succeeds in pinpointing major areas of concern, from heart health to sleep quality to mental acuity.

The checkup shows readers how to read clues in their bodies and offers advice on minimizing risk factors. Measurements such as waist circumference and resting heart rate are oldies but goodies. Surprising gems include reading your earlobe creases (the diagonal creases that form as we age are linked to coronary artery disease) and your finger length (if your index finger is shorter than your ring finger, you are at above-average risk of developing osteoarthritis).

Maggie Fazeli Fard

national

health-science

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