The Washington Post

Trummer’s on Main taps new chef (and more)

Austin Fausett, a sous chef at the Inn at Little Washington, has been appointed to be the next executive chef at Trummer’s on Main. The Wisconsin native, 27, has previously worked at Central Michel Richard and the currently shuttered Michel Richard Citronelle in Washington, Craftbar in New York and Town Hall in San Francisco. He has European experience, too; Fausett was saucier at Novelli Bacaro con Cucina in Vienna, the recipient of a star from Michelin.

Austin Fausett. (Photo by Carol Persons) Austin Fausett. (Photo by Carol Persons)

Calling his nearly two-year tenure at the Inn an “amazing experience,” Fausett says his first top kitchen job will put him on the path to his eventual goal: owning a restaurant with his wife, sommelier Morgan Fausett, wine director at the forthcoming Del Campo in Penn Quarter.

On the chef's to-do list at Trummer's is to refine the bar program, make his own burrata, and add some Virginia “low country” touches to the menu. Stay tuned for scallop carpaccio with sugar snap peas, candied ginger, sorrel and kaffir lime broth, as well as braised veal osso bucco with black-eyed peas, lemon confit and sauteed local spinach. Co-owner Stefan Trummer, a native of Graz, Austria, is encouraging his hire to come up with specials from his homeland for the summer.

Cooking wasn’t the chef’s original career path; writing was. But Fausett turned down a scholarship to attend the journalism program at the University of Wisconsin in Madison to attend a technical culinary school in his home state.

The incoming chef replaces Cory Lambert, who left the Clifton, Va. restaurant after just four months in the top job last summer. Fausett plans to join Trummer’s on Main and its kitchen crew of about 12 in mid-May.

Trummer’s isn’t waiting for his arrival to make some changes. Tonight is the debut of the restaurant’s pop-up Burger Bar in its 50-seat Gallery Room. Sous chef Ryan Carson will be offering beef, tuna, lamb, shrimp and other burgers ($8 to $12), plus french fries and milkshakes, beginning at 5 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday through May 2.

Weaned on a beige buffet a la “Fargo” in Minnesota, Tom Sietsema is the food critic for The Washington Post. This is his second tour of duty at the Post. Sietsema got his first taste in the ‘80s, when he was hired by his predecessor to answer phones, write some, and test the bulk of the Food section’s recipes. That’s how he learned to clean squid, bake colonial cakes and distinguish between nutmeg and mace.



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Fritz Hahn · April 9, 2013

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