The Washington Post

Pasta Mia to remain open while negotiating new lease

At age 74, Roberto Broglia knows it would be rather optimistic to sign a five-year lease for his iconic Pasta Mia. Which is why the owner of the Adams Morgan red-sauce house is still negotiating a new deal with the landlord, who apparently wanted a half-decade commitment.

"If something happens to me, what are we going to do?" says Broglia, his accent as thick as Bolognese. "The age is the age."

Pasta Mia plans to stick around for a little while longer. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)
Pasta Mia plans to stick around for a little while longer. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)

Broglia wants a shorter lease, in the six-month range, with an option to renew for another six months. He also wants the landlord to fix the stupid air conditioning, which has been broken for months. There may be snow on the ground today, but Broglia can already feel the humidity on his skin. He's not about to sweat out another summer with some poor window unit wheezing to keep up with the warm air that rushes into the place every time a customer walks in the door.

The owner even has a negotiating tactic: "If I walk out now," Broglia says he has argued to his landlord, "you still have to fix the air conditioning."

Broglia thinks a deal will get done, probably in a couple of weeks. He likes his landlord, he says. Both sides just need to figure out how much a new AC unit will run and how they'll split the costs.

In the meantime, Broglia says he'll remain open past Friday, Feb. 28, when his current lease expires.

"We are open," promises Broglia, who has run Pasta Mia in the same space for more than 20 years, often with a line of customers waiting outside the door. "I already told [the landlord] that I'm going to send the next month's rent."

Pasta Mia, 1790 Columbia Rd. NW. 202-328-9114. 

Tim Carman serves as the full-time writer for the Post's Food section and as the $20 Diner for the Weekend section, a double duty that requires he ingest more calories than a draft horse.



Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Show Comments
Most Read
Your Three. Videos curated for you.
Play Videos
Deaf banjo player teaches thousands
Perks of private flying
Drawing as an act of defiance
Play Videos
Husband finds love, loss in baseball
Bao: The signature dish of San Francisco
From foster homes to the working world
Play Videos
How soccer is helping Philadelphia men kick the streets
Here's why you hate the sound of your own voice
The woman behind the Nats’ presidents ‘Star Wars’ makeover
Play Videos
How hackers can control your car from miles away
How to avoid harmful chemicals in school supplies
How much can one woman eat?
Next Story
Maura Judkis · February 26, 2014

To keep reading, please enter your email address.

You’ll also receive from The Washington Post:
  • A free 6-week digital subscription
  • Our daily newsletter in your inbox

Please enter a valid email address

I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Please indicate agreement.

Thank you.

Check your inbox. We’ve sent an email explaining how to set up an account and activate your free digital subscription.