First peek at ‘Boondocks,’ sans Aaron McGruder

This undated promotional photo provided by Sony Pictures Television shows Aaron McGruder, creator and executive producer for "The Boondocks," a new animated series on Adult Swim, Cartoon Network's late-night sister network featuring animation for adults. The series follows the adventures of McGruder's junior revolutionary Huey Freeman and his hip-hop obsessed younger brother, Riley, who live in a white, middle-class suburb with their cantankerous grandfather. The TV series version of his popular comic strip "The Boondocks," premieres Sunday. Nov. 6,2005. (AP Photo/Sony Pictures Television, Kyle Christy)
Aaron McGruder, will not be involved in the show’s fourth and last season. (AP Photo/Sony Pictures Television, Kyle Christy)

There’s a new trailer for the fourth season of the “Boondocks,” but it comes with a huge caveat: the last season of the show based on the comic strip by Aaron McGruder won’t actually include McGruder. Looks like topics this season will include Granddad getting hoodwinked into an adjustable rate mortgage, a “Breaking Bad” spoof, and Granddad dating a “lost Kardashian sister.” It’s difficult to tell if it will be able to maintain the same subversive tone that defined the first three seasons.

McGruder recently shared a statement about parting from the “Boondocks” on the Facebook page for his new show, “Black Jesus:”

As the world now knows, The Boondocks will be returning for a fourth season, but I will not be returning with it. I’d like to extend my gratitude to Sony and Adult Swim for three great seasons.

I created The Boondocks two decades ago in college, did the daily comic for six years, and was showrunner on the animated series for the first three seasons. The Boondocks pretty much represents my life’s work to this point. Huey, Riley, and Granddad are not just property to me. They are my fictional blood relatives. Nothing is more painful than to leave them behind.

To quote a great white man, “Hollywood is a business.” And to quote another great white man, “Don’t hold grudges”.

What has never been lost on me is the enormous responsibility that came with The Boondocks – particularly the television show and it’s relatively young audience. It was important to offend, but equally important to offend for the right reasons. For three seasons I personally navigated this show through the minefields of controversy. It was not perfect. And it definitely was not quick. But it was always done with a keen sense of duty, history, culture, and love. Anything less would have been simply unacceptable.

As for me, I’m finally putting a life of controversy and troublemaking behind me with my upcoming Adult Swim show, BLACK JESUS.

AM

H/t Shadow and Act

Soraya Nadia McDonald covers arts, entertainment and culture for the Washington Post with a focus on race and gender issues.
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