Here’s how much snow fell from Kansas to New Jersey


Waiting for a bus in Philadelphia Monday morning. (Matt Rourke/AP)

A snowstorm continues to cut across much of the United States on Monday, canceling thousands of flights and basically shutting down the nation’s capital.

This storm was a traveler, making its way east and visiting a large stretch of the country. Snow piled up in Kansas (5 inches in Newton), Arkansas (6.5 inches in Pea Ridge), Illinois (7 inches in Mendota) and Missouri (8.5 inches in Anderson) between Saturday morning and Monday morning, the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center reported. A massive series of crashes in Denver involving 104 vehicles over a two-mile stretch occurred Saturday as snow was falling; one person died and 30 others were taken to area hospitals.

The snow kept heading east, with two inches falling in areas ranging from eastern Indiana to southern New Jersey between 9 p.m. on Sunday and 9 a.m. on Monday, according to the National Weather Service. During the same window, the numbers were even higher in areas like Clifford, Ky. (4.5 inches) and New Market, Md. (6.5 inches). The Washington region saw as much as 8 inches fall in some places by Monday afternoon, according to the Capital Weather Gang.

The storm blanketed a considerable chunk of the Eastern Seaboard on Monday morning, as you can see in these two images:

And:

Transportation officials in these snow-coated areas worked to keep the roads clean, but there were difficulties. The public works director in Washington D.C. said that because rain preceded the snow in the District, the usual road treatments of brine or beet juice before a snowstorm would be less effective, reports my colleague Mike DeBonis.

(And since we’re on the subject of beet juice, it’s only one of the odd ways to fight icy roads. In Milwaukee, they are trying to use cheese brine on icy roads, because Wisconsin is a delightful place where dreams of cheese-scented roads come true. Wauconda, Ill., is considering switching to molasses. And even using the popular standby — rock salt — doesn’t always work out: New Jersey relies on rock salt, but an old maritime law recently stranded a big shipment of the salt in Maine.)

And it’s still not over, with snow globe-like conditions lingering around Washington and other places in the Mid-Atlantic. Winter storm warnings and winter weather advisories remain in place from Texas to New Jersey:


Pink means winter storm warning; purple means winter weather advisory. (As of 1:55 p.m., via the National Weather Service)
Mark Berman is a reporter on the National staff. He runs Post Nation, a destination for breaking news and developing stories from around the country.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read National
Next Story
Mark Berman · March 3