There’s an app for that: Did a man ask Siri for help hiding body?


Pedro Bravo looks at a laptop of defense team member J.D. Thomas during his murder trial this week. (AP Photo/The Gainesville Sun, Doug Finger)

Did a 20-year-old accused of killing an 18-year-old in Florida turn to Siri to find a place to dump the body? Great question!

A Gainesville courtroom on Tuesday saw an image that was allegedly on Pedro Bravo’s iPhone, which displayed the question “I need to hide my roommate,” according to a local TV news station.

“What kind of place are you looking for?” Siri responded. “Swamps. Reservoirs. Metal foundries. Dumps.”

The case seems pretty complicated, however.

“This is not evidence that he ever did an inquiry, looking for some information online for needing to hide his roommate,” Bravo’s attorney said to Gainesville Police Department detective Matt Goeckel, according to a CBS affiliate.

“Correct,” the detective replied.

“Bravo’s attorney pointed out the screen grab was among hundreds of pictures that were on Bravo’s phone and that the search may not have been initiated by his client,” the station reported.

WUFT News has a transcript.

Bravo is charged with killing Christian Aguilar, a University of Florida student whose body was found in a wooded area in north Florida in 2012. Investigators believe he strangled Aguilar then left his body in a shallow grave.

Police say the flashlight on Bravo’s iPhone was turned on the day Aguilar was killed, the Gainesville Sun reported. Bravo’s defense attorney, Stephen Bernstein, protested the evidence, saying he couldn’t question the person who provided it to authorities.

“I have no ability to confront how it was done,” Bernstein said.

FWIW, on Wednesday I asked Siri the same question that was allegedly on Bravo’s phone — I DO NOT HAVE A BODY TO HIDE GUYS I JUST WANTED TO SEE WHAT HAPPENED FOR JOURNALISM — and honestly, the only thing I’ve ever used Siri for before is this. Here’s what I got:

Me too.
Me too. (Me/My iPhone)

This story have been updated with additional testimony, and its headline has been changed to reflect that.

Sarah Larimer is a general assignment reporter for the Washington Post.
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