Romney relying more on teleprompters


Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney delivers a speech as he campaigns in Des Moines, Iowa, on Nov. 4. (Charles Dharapak -- Associated Press)

Mitt Romney’s heavy use of teleprompters in recent days symbolizes the evolution of his stump speech. Throughout this campaign, Romney usually spoke extemporaneously and with only a few written notes. For formal policy addresses, he read his prepared remarks from teleprompters. But for his standard rallies, he stitched together his speeches, seemingly off the cuff, from an assortment of well-practiced and familiar riffs. He regularly took jabs at Obama’s eloquence, often noting to loud applause that sterling rhetoric does not make a sterling record.

But with his closing argument speech — which he debuted Friday morning in West Allis, Wis., (using teleprompters) — Romney is reaching for sterling rhetoric of his own. 

Read the whole story.

Philip Rucker is a national political correspondent for The Washington Post, where he has reported since 2005.

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