Ray Kelly defends New York’s controversial ‘stop and frisk’ law

New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly on Sunday defended the city's controversial "stop and frisk" law that was recently rejected by a federal judge.

The law has allowed officers to detain, question

NewYork City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, left, speaks while Police Commissioner RayKelly looks on during a news conference in NewYork, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013. A U.S. judge has appointed a monitor to oversee the NewYork Police Department's controversial stop-and-search policy, saying it intentionally discriminates based on race and has violated the rights of tens of thousands of people. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig) NewYork City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, left, speaks while Police Commissioner Ray Kelly looks on during a news conference in New York, Monday, Aug. 12, 2013. A U.S. judge has appointed a monitor to oversee the city's police department's controversial stop-and-search policy, saying it intentionally discriminates based on race and has violated the rights of tens of thousands of people. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

and potentially search pedestrians if they have a "reasonable suspicion" they have committed or are about to commit a crime. A federal judge last week ruled the law unconstitutional, saying it is a "form of racial profiling."

"The judge, in this case, has indicted an entire police department, almost 36,000 police officers -- for racial profiling -- based on what we believe is very flimsy information, flimsy evidence," Kelly said on CBS' "Face The Nation."

New York City is appealing the judge's ruling.

New York's controversial stop-and-frisk policy is under fire, but mayor Michael Bloomberg is fighting back. John Jay College of Criminal Justice professor Eli Silverman and the NYCLU's Jason Starr discuss the ruling's impact. (The Washington Post)

Sean Sullivan has covered national politics for The Washington Post since 2012.

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Sean Sullivan · August 18, 2013

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