WH threatens to veto House GOP bill blocking Obamacare

President Obama has urged House Republicans not to use a continuing resolution as a way to overturn Obamacare. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) President Obama has urged House Republicans not to use a continuing resolution as a way to overturn Obamacare. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)

The White House issued a veto threat Thursday against the House proposal to keep the government running beyond Sept. 30, which would prevent the government from spending any money to implement portions of the Affordable Care Act.

The Statement of Administration Policy states the president would veto the resolution "because it advances a narrow ideological agenda that threatens our economy and the interests of the middle class. The Resolution would defund the Affordable Care Act, denying millions of hard-working middle class families the security of affordable health coverage."

"The Administration is willing to support a short-term continuing resolution to allow critical Government functions to operate without interruption and looks forward to working with the Congress on appropriations legislation for the remainder of the fiscal year that preserves critical national priorities, protects national security, and makes investments to spur economic growth and job creation for years to come," it continues.

In other words, even with the prospect of a government shutdown, the White House is not backing down.

Juliet Eilperin is The Washington Post's White House bureau chief, covering domestic and foreign policy as well as the culture of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. She is the author of two books—one on sharks, and another on Congress, not to be confused with each other—and has worked for the Post since 1998.

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Aaron Blake · September 19, 2013

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