Photo essay: Rebirth of Detroit?


A man walks past graffiti in Detroit, Michigan, December 3, 2013. (Photo by Reuters/Joshua Lott)

 


Pedestrians cross Woodward Avenue in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 17, 2012. (Photo by Jeff Kowalsky/Bloomberg)

 


Rubbish sits on one side of the street as an abandoned building sits empty on the other side on the east side of Detroit, Michigan on August 13, 2014. JP Morgan Chase is investing $100-million to help the city of Detroit with blight removal, urban development and home loans and retraining people in the work force. (Photo by Joshua Lott for The Washington Post)

 


Three distinctly different styles of homes have in common that they have been boarded up and decaying for many years, as seen in this photo on June 6, 2014. Detroit has tens of thousands of blighted, abandoned and burned-out structures. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post)

 


A pedestrian walks by a graffiti marked wall in west Detroit on Thursday, Dec. 11, 2008. The roots of Detroit’s current plight go back decades. Court-ordered school busing and the 12th Street riots of 1967 accelerated an exodus of whites to the suburbs, and many middle-class blacks followed, shrinking the city’s population from a peak of 1.8 million in the 1950s to half that now. (Photo by AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

 


The 1967 riots were a major turning point in the Motor City’s economic history. Here, a National Guardsman stands at the ready at a Detroit intersection during the summer riots. (Photo by AP)

 


Entire blocks of buildings were destroyed by fire in Detroit, July 24, 1967 after rioters firebombed the filling station, right, and the fire spread to other buildings. Rampaging blacks hampered firemen called to fight the blaze. Intersection is Linwood, right, and Pingree on Detroit’s near West Side. (Photo by AP)

 


Paint peels of an abandoned building in the Corktown neighborhood of Detroit, Michigan August 13, 2014. JP Morgan Chase is investing $100-million to help the city of Detroit with blight removal, urban development and home loans and retraining people in the work force. (Photo by Joshua Lott for The Washington Post)

 


The massive Packard auto plant lies in ruins on July 7, 2014. The plant opened in 1903 and at the time was considered the most modern automobile manufacturing facility in the world. The factory complex closed in 1958. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post)

 


On July 18, 2013 Detroit became the largest city in U.S. history to file for bankruptcy when state-appointed emergency manager Kevyn Orr asked a federal judge for municipal bankruptcy protection. The city, which was the nation’s fourth-largest in the 1940s, with nearly 2 million inhabitants, has seen its population plummet to 700,000 as residents fled rising crime and deteriorating basic services, taking their tax dollars with them. (Photo by Paul Sancya/AP)

 


A Detroit merchandise store sign is seen in a window downtown on July 19, 2013. (Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)
Whitney Shefte is a Peabody, Emmy and Pictures of the Year International (POYi) Award-winning senior video journalist at The Washington Post, where she has worked since 2006. Whitney is also the visuals editor for Storyline.
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