For debt-limit deniers, the answer is always ‘No.’

When it comes to a debt deal, some lawmakers will never vote yes — not just because they believe it’s bad for the country, but because, they say, the debt limit simply does not exist.


Last fall, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew repeatedly warned Congress that a failure to raise the debt ceiling would cause the U.S. to default on debts at home and abroad, but some conservative skeptics dismissed his pleas as a scare tactic.

Lawmakers eventually voted to raise the debt ceiling for three months in the 11th hour with bipartisan support, but not before the debt-ceiling deniers got a chance to have their say.

And while it appears that more Republicans seem amenable to a deal this time around, here's a look at a few who are not likely to change their position any time soon.

Some conservative members of Congress claimed raising the debt ceiling last fall was a non-issue, but would still not compromise. (Julie Percha/The Washington Post)

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Jaime Fuller · February 11, 2014

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