Think the Obamacare subsidies rulings will change the politics of the law? Think again.

You might be tempted -- particularly if you are a Republican -- to see today's D.C. federal appeals court ruling invalidating subsidies for people buying insurance in the federal marketplace under Obamacare as a major moment in the political path of the law. You also might be tempted -- particularly if you are Democrat -- to see today's 4th District Court of Appeals decision that the subsidies were ok as a major moment in the political path of the law.

Don't do it.

While these decisions could have major policy implications for President Obama's signature legislative accomplishment, there is virtually no chance that either one will have any near or even medium term impact on the politics surrounding Obamacare.

Why? Because minds are entirely made up about the law.

Among all Americans, more people disapprove of Obamacare than approve. And, with the occasional blip here or there, those numbers have been steady for the better part of the last three years.


Image courtesy of Kaiser Family Foundation

Republicans hate the law -- and have for quite some time.


Image courtesy of Kaiser Family Foundation

Democrats like the law -- and have for quite some time.


Image courtesy of Kaiser Family Foundation

Obamacare has been, almost since its introduction into the political debate, a stand-in for feelings about President Obama.  Like him, you like the law. Don't like him, you don't.  And, like with Obama's approval numbers -- which are also in the low 40s at the moment -- Republicans are more united in their dislike of Obamacare than Democrats are united in support of it. That was true before today and it will be true after today.

The political debate over Obamacare is over.

Chris Cillizza writes “The Fix,” a politics blog for the Washington Post. He also covers the White House.

politics

the-fix

Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Politics

politics

the-fix

Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Next Story
Philip Bump · July 22, 2014

To keep reading, please enter your email address.

You’ll also receive from The Washington Post:
  • A free 6-week digital subscription
  • Our daily newsletter in your inbox

Please enter a valid email address

I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Please indicate agreement.

Thank you.

Check your inbox. We’ve sent an email explaining how to set up an account and activate your free digital subscription.