Back to previous page


Post Most

Anti-biking attitudes put District riders at risk

According to the May 2 editorial “Sharing the streets,” bicycle ridership in the District increased 80 percent from 2007 to 2011. At the same time, congestion and attendant driver aggressiveness have become even worse. If cyclists are “welcome,” as the editorial claimed, where is the network of dedicated, protected bike lanes cyclists have the right to expect?

The indignation against bikers who manipulate their way through the huge parking lot into which our city’s streets have been converted is sheer envy on the part of frustrated motorists who would dearly like to do the same.

The other day, a woman in an SUV got behind us on Connecticut Avenue and began insistently beeping. When you are on two wheels and are being threatened by two tons of steel, it is more than a little intimidating. It was a beautiful day in front of the zoo, and the foot traffic on the sidewalk was such that even pedestrians had difficulty getting through. We asked the woman why she was beeping. Her response: “You were in the street.” When we asked where she expected us to ride, she drove off.

At that same spot last year a young man in a panel truck shouted obscenities and threatened to run one of us over for biking in front of him.

We suggest that the editorial writer who penned this piece be required to commute to work on a bicycle for a while. This sort of “let them eat cake” pontificating is outrageous. Mayor Vincent C. Gray, are you listening?

Richard Robin, Washington

John Glad, Washington

© The Washington Post Company