September 23, 2013

The mantra of the Republicans, including House Speaker John A. Boehner, is that the American people don’t want Obamacare [“House approves budget defunding health-care law,” front page, Sept. 21]. The Republicans appear to think that if they repeat this enough times it will become true and people will believe it. This message is simply not true. 

While the American people may have some concerns about certain aspects of the law, they, in general, do want the Affordable Care Act or else they would not have elected President Obama to a second term.

Allen Feldman, North Potomac

Compromise means that both sides give up something for an agreement that benefits both sides. Today, Obamacare is not ready, as all the granted exceptions prove. So the Obama administration should offer to postpone Obamacare’s start until Jan. 1, 2015, which allows the 2014 midterm elections to be a democratic “decider” of whether the law remains or is repealed. Those working on the law will then have the time to truly get it ready while Republicans can serve their supporters with its delay. Democratic Party claims that this shouldn’t be necessary ignore the party’s crushing defeat in 2010 and the basic fairness of the need for it to compromise.

Max Rugemer, Fairfax

Two hundred-plus years ago, my ancestors endured heavy tariffs to satisfy borrowing authorized by the Continental Congress. Our founders realized that repaying these obligations would enhance the international credibility of a young nation. What would our founders (and my ancestors) say to the vocal minority today who would squander that proud legacy of fiscal rectitude in order to block implementation of a law they lack sufficient votes to repeal?

Tim Andrews, Fairfax City

In her Sept. 22 op-ed column, “Let’s delay Obamacare,” Kathleen Parker bemoaned the fact that a 60-year-old could pay a $615 monthly premium for health coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). I am 62, and were I to retire next year, the cost for me to replicate the coverage I currently have as a Fairfax County employee would be $1,047. I’m no mathematician, but Obamacare seems like the better deal. Plus, under the ACA, I would be able to obtain coverage regardless of any preexisting conditions.

Those who oppose Obamacare have a right to their opinion, but they really need to examine whether their opposition is based in fact or simply a dislike of President Obama and what they view as the socialist nature of the legislation.

Bernadette Carter, Chantilly

Kathleen Parker suggested that the best way forward for Obamacare and for the GOP may be to delay the law’s implementation. I respect Ms. Parker; as one of the few moderate Republicans left, she usually has good insight. On this particular issue, though, her insight was incomplete. Just delaying Obamacare, given Republican behavior, is a nonstarter. However, in the interests of compromise, how about this counteroffer: Obamacare implementation gets delayed one year. At the end of that year, Obamacare gets implemented in full, with no repeal or defunding allowed for 10 years — unless Congress can pass a better bill.

Republicans have been saying they want a health-care law, just not this one. Okay, prove it. Republicans ran on “repeal and replace.” There’s been lots of repeal, but where’s the replace? Either propose something better to accomplish Obamacare’s goals or stop wasting taxpayers’ money and time.

Chris Wilcox, Fulton

All this nonsense about the government closing down because the Republicans on Capitol Hill have not done this or that reminds me of the news articles I would see at the end of June so many decades ago, when the federal government’s fiscal year ended on June 30. Every year I would read about how the government was going to shut down because Congress, controlled by Democrats back then, had not passed its appropriations bills and was fighting with the president on this or that issue. A shutdown never happened.

Someone got the idea that the solution was to move the start of the new fiscal year from July 1 to Oct. 1. All that did was to move the date The Post would run its government-shutdown articles from the last week of June to the last week of September.

These battles occur with such predictability that anyone with a little bit of imagination can sit down today and write draft articles and editorials to run in the last week of September 2014 or even September 2050. They are as repetitive as the set-your-clocks-back articles about the end of daylight saving time.

So everyone, just chill. It always works out — at the last minute.

Philip Christenson, Washington