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The rabbis who gave their lives in military service

We applaud Hamil R. Harris’s story about the dedication of the Jewish Chaplains Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery [“Rabbis remembered,” Metro, Oct. 25]. We thank him and The Post for covering this milestone event honoring, among others, the four chaplains who gave their lives by passing their life jackets on to others before their torpedoed ship sank in World War II. We would like to clarify the story of Rabbi Alexander Goode for the historical record. Although born in Brooklyn, he was raised in Washington and graduated from Eastern High School. He joined the Army as a chaplain at the time when he was serving as rabbi of Beth Israel synagogue in York, Pa. He had spent summers working at Washington Hebrew Congregation in the District while he was in rabbinical school.

Laura Cohen Apelbaum, Washington

The writer is executive director of the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington.

It was heartwarming to read about the dedication of the memorial to the 14 Jewish chaplains who died serving the U.S. military.

The article quoted Rabbi Alexander Goode’s son-in-law, Paul Fried, but did not mention his daughter, Rosalie Goode Fried, a high school classmate of mine.

Like her father, Rosalie was a graduate of a D.C. public school (Wilson). She was also co-founder of the Immortal Chaplains Foundation, which supports interfaith cooperation. Rosalie would have been so pleased to witness this dedication, but she died in a traffic accident in 1999.

There are many other memorials to the four chaplains who gave their lives during the sinking of the USS Dorchester in 1943, including a stained-glass window at Washington National Cathedral.

Maryanne B. Kendall, Reston

A separate memorial to the heroism and sacrifice of the chaplains from the USS Dorchester honored at Arlington National Cemetery is also worthy of mention. In a form evoking a sinking ship’s hull, a striking structure known as the Four Chaplains Memorial stands at the entrance to National Memorial Park, a cemetery on Lee Highway in Falls Church.

As a boyhood stamp collector, I also remember the commemorative stamp honoring the four chaplains that was issued in 1948.

Ed Kimmel, Arlington

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