Worst Week in Washington
A weekly award honoring inhabitants of Planet Beltway

Who had the worst week in Washington? Dick Morris.

Dick Morris has had a rough 15 years or so.

Since playing an influential behind-the-scenes role in helping Bill Clinton win reelection in 1996, Morris has become something between a pariah and a punch line.

Worst Week in Washington

Chris Cillizza grants the award to the Democrat, Republican, West Wing dweller, Capitol Hill insider, K Street dealer, business guru, sports hero, think tank scribblers or other inhabitant of Planet Beltway who experienced the absolute worst week.

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His latest indignity came this past week, when Fox News Channel decided not to renew his contract as an on-air political analyst. No official reason was given, but Morris’s tendency to make wild (and wildly incorrect) predictions about the election — he said repeatedly that Mitt Romney would win in a “landslide” — had to have a little something to do with it.

Parting ways in the world of cable television is, of course, not uncommon. And many people who have been dropped over the years have come back on other networks to much success.

But rather than simply taking his medicine and plotting his next move, Morris decided that going on Piers Morgan’s show on CNN to explain himself was a good idea. It was not.

Introducing Morris, Morgan said: “We begin tonight with a political fail heard around the world.” And it only got worse from there.

Morgan repeatedly showed clips of Morris making boldly wrong predictions and then asked him for explanations, while interjecting things like, “Look, to be honest to you, I feel painful listening to that.”

Morris tried, feebly, to defend himself, noting that he had forecast the 60-plus seats House Republicans gained in 2010 and then ticking off his resume: “I have gotten 30 senators and governors elected, 14 presidents and prime ministers.” But the fight had already been ruled a technical knockout.

Dick Morris, for continuing a remarkably long losing streak on national television, you had the worst week in Washington. Congrats, or something.

Have a candidate for the Worst Week in Washington? E-mail Chris Cillizza at chris.cillizza@wpost.com.

Can’t remember who had the worst week in Washington last week?

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