The Washington Redskins head coach loses the game, wins the prize. (Matt Rourke/AP)
Aaron Blake
Reporter November 29, 2013

After the hapless Redskins limped to a 27-6 defeat at the hands of the San Francisco 49ers on “Monday Night Football,” head coach Mike Shanahan and star wide receiver Pierre Garçon could practically see the heads starting to roll.

“I think the players are smart enough to understand that if you are 3-8 that everybody is playing for their jobs,” Shanahan said. “That’s the nature of our business. I don’t care if it’s players, coaches, support staff.”

Aaron Blake covers national politics and writes regularly for The Fix. View Archive

Garçon added: “Everybody’s job’s on the line when you’re losing. . . . Any day, you can get cut, or you can get released or fired.”

Garçon is being modest. Having the best season of his career and ranking second in the NFL in receptions, he’s not going to get cut.

Shanahan, on the other hand? Well, that’s a different story.

A two-time Super Bowl-winning head coach with the Denver Broncos, Shanahan looked a year ago like he had the nucleus to compete for championships for years to come — Rookie of the Year quarterback Robert Griffin III and fellow rookie running back Alfred Morris. But now the Redskins can barely dream of making the playoffs, with still five games to play.

Not only that, but Griffin looks like half the quarterback he was last year after knee surgery, which, we should note, resulted from Shanahan’s controversial decision to start him in the 2012 playoffs on a bum knee. (The coach won Worst Week for that move.)

After Monday night’s loss, Morris said the team hadn’t had “the greatest of weeks” in preparation. At 24-35 in his Redskins career, Shanahan is forced to answer questions about whether that’s his fault.

Mike Shanahan, for finding that the hot seat can get pretty toasty, you had the worst week in Washington. Congrats, or something.

Have a candidate for the Worst Week in Washington? E-mail Chris Cillizza at chris.cillizza@washpost.com.

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