An EMT recalls a slain NYPD officer’s final moments: ‘I tried to get him to talk to me’

Tantania Alexander, 23, recounts a tragic day.

  • Danielle Paquette
  • ·
  • 2 days ago
Aging in America

He was tortured for three years. Now he’s fighting against it — and denouncing the CIA

Perico Rodriguez survived torture during Argentina's 'Dirty War' -- including a version of waterboarding.

  • Danielle Paquette
  • ·
  • 2 days ago
The New Cuba

Five of the most (in)famous U.S. fugitives in Cuba

As relations with the island nation normalize, here's a look at the most well-known fugitives there -- past and present.

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • 3 days ago
Liftoff and Letdown

How a simple change to the tax code could help the middle class

Economist Melissa Kearney on how the tax system helps the middle class - and how to improve it.

  • Melissa Kearney
  • ·
  • 4 days ago
Liftoff and Letdown

The case that the middle class is doing better than we think

Manhattan Institute scholar Scott Winship argues that the economy is actually still working for the middle class.

  • Scott Winship
  • ·
  • 4 days ago
Racial disparities

If you’re poor, your mortgage rate can depend on the color of your skin

A new study finds that black borrowers were 50 percent more likely to have overpaid for their mortgages between 2004-2008​. Here's why.

  • Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • 5 days ago
Racial disparities

A block in Brooklyn is transformed by a police shooting

“I know it sounds crazy,” one young resident says, “but it's hard to have sympathy here, seeing what they do every day."

  • Danielle Paquette
  • ·
  • 5 days ago
The cost of climate change

Miami’s climate catch-22: Building waterfront condos to pay for protection against the rising sea

In one of cities most vulnerable to climate change, a high-stakes bet to out-build the sea.

  • Danielle Paquette
  • ·
  • 6 days ago
Liftoff and Letdown

The decline of the middle class, in video-game format

Imagine if the economy was an arcade game. Here’s why it’s so difficult for middle class workers to win.

  • Jim Tankersley
  • ·
  • 6 days ago
Global health

Imagine a disease wiping out 64,000 U.S. doctors. Now, you understand Ebola in Sierra Leone.

Ebola threatens to decimate doctors in a country that cannot afford the loss.

  • Todd C. Frankel
  • ·
  • 6 days ago
Racial disparities

Eric Adams says New York police beat him. He became an officer to change the culture.

The Brooklyn borough president asked New Yorkers to work on race and police relations following fatal shooting of two NYPD officers.

  • Danielle Paquette
  • ·
  • 6 days ago
The New Cuba

Cuba still harbors one of America’s most wanted fugitives. What happens to Assata Shakur now?

Folk hero, fugitive, a most wanted terrorist -- and Tupac's godmother -- Shakur fled to Cuba decades ago. Her fate is uncertain.

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 20, 2014
The way we work

Labor board takes big step toward helping all McDonald’s employees unionize

The National Labor Relations Board filed complaints against the company itself -- not just its franchisees -- for labor violations. That makes all workers its employees.

  • Lydia DePillis
  • ·
  • Dec 19, 2014
How the ACA is changing us

Your opinion on Obamacare can depend on what question you’re asked

A recent poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation suggests that people’s views on Obamacare are more flexible than you might think

  • Ana Swanson
  • ·
  • Dec 19, 2014
Liftoff and Letdown

You can’t help today’s middle class with 1930s-era policies

Heather Boushey of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth argues for a new approach to boost workers.

  • Heather Boushey
  • ·
  • Dec 19, 2014
Sexual assault on campus

Rape on campus: Not as prevalent as it is off campus

Government data show that students aren't sexually assaulted as often as non-students.

  • Lydia DePillis
  • ·
  • Dec 19, 2014
Liftoff and Letdown

Globalization isn’t America’s problem, education is

NYU Business School Dean Peter Blair Henry argues for educating more low-income Americans to help the middle class.

  • Peter Blair Henry
  • ·
  • Dec 19, 2014
Pocket Economist

No, Virginia, Christmas is not an ‘orgy of wealth destruction’

One economist has long argued that giving presents is inefficient. But here's an economic defense of gift-giving.

  • Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • Dec 19, 2014
Liftoff and Letdown

The argument that most workers are better off without unions

James Sherk, of the Heritage Foundation, makes the case that declining union membership isn't hurting the middle class, and is in fact, helping.

  • James Sherk
  • ·
  • Dec 18, 2014
The New Cuba

Great news, America: Canada says you’re going to like Cuba

It's Canada's third-favorite travel destination. Here's why.

  • Natasha Rudnick
  • ·
  • Dec 18, 2014
The New Cuba

Cuban-Americans on the Cuba lost and the Cuba that could be

Can 'hope be restored to a nation?' Cuban-Americans' reactions to a historic policy change.

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 18, 2014
The New Cuba

This Minnesota cattle farmer had been doing a brisk business in Cuba. And then it stopped.

Ralph Kaehler started selling cows and feed to Cuba after agricultural trade was legalized in 2000. But after a while, politics got in the way.

  • Lydia DePillis
  • ·
  • Dec 18, 2014
The New Cuba

Cuba’s displaced ‘Peter Pan’ generation looks homeward with mixed feelings

They left Cuba for America in the early 1960s. They've been cut off from their home ever since. Until now.

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 18, 2014
Liftoff and Letdown

‘Pro-business’ is bad business for the middle class

George Mason economist Matthew Mitchell argues government handouts to companies hurt workers.

  • Matthew Mitchell
  • ·
  • Dec 17, 2014
Racial disparities

4 decades of desegregation in American colleges, charted

There's at least one bit of good news about college in America: It's more diverse than ever.

  • Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • Dec 17, 2014
Liftoff and Letdown

If you want to help the poor, fix the safety net

The head of a large Texas charity on what keeps people in poverty -- including bad government incentives.

  • Jim Tankersley
  • ·
  • Dec 17, 2014
Racial disparities

How one white mother talked to her two black children about racism in America

Paula Fitzgibbons wants those who are considering or facilitating adoptions to understand that race does matter.

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 17, 2014
The way we work

The Department of Transportation wants truckers to sleep more. Congress said no.

The "cromnibus" temporarily rolled back some limits on how long drivers can go without a rest.

  • Lydia DePillis
  • ·
  • Dec 16, 2014
What policy works

What happens when you take away disability benefits from kids and their parents

Kids don't earn more when their disability checks disappear — but their parents do.

  • Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • Dec 16, 2014
Immigration stalemate

Here’s how our immigration laws actually encourage illegal immigration

Four rules that force immigrants to make impossible choices.

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 16, 2014
Liftoff and Letdown

Immigration isn’t killing the middle class

One in seven Americans were born abroad. Don't blame them for what ails working people, economist Tim Kane says.

  • Tim Kane
  • ·
  • Dec 15, 2014
Liftoff and Letdown

Life where worker pay peaked 45 years ago

In Granite City, Ill., the steel mill still hums, but its impact on the economy has changed.

  • Todd C. Frankel
  • ·
  • Dec 15, 2014
Remaking cities

Can tax breaks for big corporations turn around one of America’s most dangerous cities?

Economists know that location-based tax incentives don't work. But could $600 million worth help Camden, N.J.?

  • Lydia DePillis
  • ·
  • Dec 15, 2014
Racial disparities

In N.C., death of black teen raises question: Was it suicide or a lynching?

Lennon Lacy, 17, was found hanging from a playground set in a small town. Now, protesters are demanding the FBI look into how this teen died.

  • Todd C. Frankel
  • ·
  • Dec 14, 2014
Aging in America

‘Warehouses for the dying’: Are we prolonging life or prolonging death?

‘What have they done to deserve this punishment?’ Some doctors question aggressive treatments for the dying.

  • Peter Whoriskey
  • ·
  • Dec 12, 2014
Racial disparities

“I’ve finally started writing”: poems about Ferguson from Baltimore kids

"Believing old pains and forgotten sorrow, African Americans, meet the New Jim Crow," writes one 13-year-old.

  • Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • Dec 12, 2014
Immigration

Why hotels support citizenship for immigrants

A hospitality leader explains the industry's involvement in the immigration debate.

  • Danielle Paquette
  • ·
  • Dec 12, 2014
America's military

This is how it feels to torture

Those featured in the Senate's report on CIA interrogation techniques are likely doomed to lives of secret shame.

  • Lydia DePillis
  • ·
  • Dec 11, 2014
Sexual assault on campus

“The attention you get as a rape victim is not fun, it’s awful”

Katie Hnida on why she came forward, what she sees in U-Va. case

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 11, 2014
Sexual assault on campus

“To this day, people call me a liar”: A campus rape victim’s story, 10 years on

U.Va. isn't the first time a campus has faced wrenching questions about sexual assault

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 11, 2014
America's military

He refused to force-feed detainees. Now, he could lose his job.

A nurse's career hangs in the balance over the treatment of prisoners.

  • Danielle Paquette
  • ·
  • Dec 11, 2014
The state of college

Women are dominating men at college. Blame sexism.

One major obstacle to getting more men in college: They don't want to be nurses or teachers.

  • Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • Dec 11, 2014
Liftoff and Letdown

The middle class took America to the moon. Then something went wrong.

Coming soon: The story of how the economy stopped boosting millions of American workers - and how to get it going again.

  • Jim Tankersley and Whitney Shefte
  • ·
  • Dec 10, 2014
Global health

‘The Ebola fighters’ and the question, ‘What the hell am I doing here?’

What it was like to watch TIME's "Person of the Year" in action in Africa.

  • Todd C. Frankel
  • ·
  • Dec 10, 2014
Immigration stalemate

A single mistake made over a decade ago can get you deported – even after Obama’s action

Javier Licón has a DUI. It may block him from presidential relief.

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 10, 2014
Racial disparities

In Ferguson, real estate agents are using the protests as a selling point

The unrest has hurt the housing market there. But some agents are trying to turn that into a positive.

  • Todd C. Frankel
  • ·
  • Dec 9, 2014
Racial disparities

She’s lived in Ferguson for 15 years. But the protests forced her to move.

Residents in Ferguson are caught in the middle between police and protests that are making life impossible for some.

  • Todd C. Frankel
  • ·
  • Dec 9, 2014

Incomes actually went up after Hurricane Katrina. But economists don’t know why.

Surprising new research shows that people living in New Orleans were financially better off after Katrina.

  • Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • Dec 9, 2014
Can private money fix public problems?

If you put 10,000 people’s genomes in the cloud, could you demystify autism?

A joint venture with Google and Autism Speaks will try to shed light on the genetics of a puzzling disease.

  • Jim Tankersley
  • ·
  • Dec 9, 2014
The way we work

The dean of American labor reporters explains everything

Veteran New York Times journalist Steven Greenhouse is retiring, at a very interesting time in the history of American labor.

  • Lydia DePillis
  • ·
  • Dec 8, 2014
How the ACA is changing us

Five ways Obamacare has already changed America

Love it or hate it, the Affordable Care Act has given us a number of lessons on the way we consume health care. Here are a few.

  • Danielle Paquette and Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • Dec 8, 2014
Immigration stalemate

What it’s like for a 13-year-old kid to learn his parents are undocumented

Much of the discussion of the president’s action has been on immigrant parents, but children are arguably the chief beneficiaries.

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 5, 2014
Racial disparities

The surprising origins of the #CrimingWhileWhite movement

A chain of white confessions on Twitter -- and its backlash -- showcases the best and worst of American talk on race.

  • Drew Harwell and Danielle Paquette
  • ·
  • Dec 5, 2014
Racial disparities

Police union: ‘We don’t believe it’s an issue of race. We believe it’s an issue of poverty’

We asked the national head of the Fraternal Order of Police about race relations and police prosecutions.

  • Lydia DePillis
  • ·
  • Dec 4, 2014
Miscellany

Bodycams transformed a tiny airport police force. They could do the same for the rest of America.

Could a sharp drop in traveler complaints today foreshadow more peaceful relationships between Americans and police officers in the near future?

  • Danielle Paquette
  • ·
  • Dec 4, 2014
Pocket Economist

How al-Qaeda works like the Boy Scouts

An Air Force colonel's research suggests we target too many terror leaders -- and not enough accountants.

  • Jim Tankersley
  • ·
  • Dec 4, 2014
Miscellany

People around you control your mind: The latest evidence

It's hard to measure peer pressure, but its effects are perhaps more powerful than we thought.

  • Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • Dec 4, 2014
The way we work

It’s not just fast food: The Fight for $15 is for everyone now

With discount retail and gas station employees joining the picket lines today, the protests have expanded into nearly every low-wage sector.

  • Lydia DePillis
  • ·
  • Dec 4, 2014
Immigration stalemate

You’re in. Your neighbors are out. Life as an immigrant after Obama’s executive action.

A tight-knit trailer park community of immigrants negotiates the dividing lines created by Obama's immigration action.

  • Tina Griego
  • ·
  • Dec 3, 2014
The cost of climate change

The old man and the rising sea

On one of the most vulnerable islands in America, a longtime caretaker makes peace with climate change.

  • Jeff Guo
  • ·
  • Dec 2, 2014
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