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Cake Scrap Cherry Ice Cream

Cake Scrap Cherry Ice Cream 12.000

Linda Davidson/The Washington Post

The Process Jun 27, 2012

Adding cake scraps to ice cream is a good way to use them up. This recipe is a variation of the no-cook, condensed milk ice cream recipes readily available online.

When you're pitting the cherries, it's okay if they get slightly crushed; that's the shape they need to be in for this recipe.

Make Ahead: The ice cream mixture needs to be refrigerated for several hours or up to overnight. The ice cream needs to be frozen for an hour or two. It is best served right after that, so the cherry chunks don’t have a chance to freeze completely and crystallize.


Servings: 12

Yield: Makes about 1 1/2 quarts

Ingredients
  • 1 pound sweet cherries, stemmed, pitted and slightly crushed (about 3 cups; see headnote)
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • Freshly squeezed juice from 1/2 lemon (1 tablespoon)
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 6 drops natural red food coloring (optional)
  • 5 ounces (1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons) evaporated milk
  • 14 ounces (1 can) sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 1/2 cups cake scraps of choice, cut into 2-inch chunks

Directions

Place half the cherries in a small bowl and stir in half of the almond extract.

Combine the remaining cherries and extract, the lemon juice, sugar, cardamom and food coloring, if using, and the milks in a blender. Puree until smooth. Transfer to a container, cover and refrigerate for several hours or up to overnight.

Transfer the chilled mixture to an ice cream maker and process according to manufacturer's directions. Quickly transfer the ice cream to a stainless-steel bowl and gently fold in the cake scraps and the reserved cherries. Place plastic wrap directly on the surface of the ice cream and transfer it to the freezer for an hour or two before serving. (The ice cream will be pleasantly soft rather than rock hard.)


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Recipe Source

Adapted from a southernliving.com recipe by The Process columnist David Hagedorn.

Tested by David Hagedorn.

E-mail questions to the Food Section.

E-mail questions to the Food Section at food@washpost.com.

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Ingredients are too variable for a meaningful analysis.

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