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Fried Brussels Sprouts With Paprika-Spiked Dipping Sauce

Fried Brussels Sprouts With Paprika-Spiked Dipping Sauce 6.000

Katherine Frey/The Washington Post

Nov 14, 2012

Here's an easy hot snack that will give your guests something to nosh on as you're putting the finishing touches on the meal.

The Brussels sprouts must be washed and thoroughly dried well in advance of frying.

Make Ahead: The dipping sauce can be made, covered and refrigerated up to 2 days in advance. Bring to room temperature before serving and re-blend if needed. The sprouts can be fried an hour in advance and held at room temperature. Reheat them in the oven when your guests walk in the door.


Servings: 6
Ingredients
  • For the sauce
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 large egg (see NOTES)
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sweet paprika
  • 1 cup olive oil
  • For the Brussels sprouts
  • Peanut oil, for frying
  • 1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved, retaining enough of the stem so that the sprout stays together (see NOTES)
  • Salt

Directions

For the sauce: Combine the garlic, egg, lemon juice, salt and paprika in the bowl of a food processor or a blender jar. With the machine running, add the oil in a slow, steady stream. Process or blend until the mixture thickens, 2 to 4 minutes.

For the Brussels sprouts: Line a plate with paper towels.

Pour the oil into a Dutch oven or deep cast-iron skillet to a depth of 1 inch and heat over medium heat. Once the oil shimmers, gently slide half of the sprouts into the oil. Fry for 2 minutes on each side, until the sprouts are browned and crisp. Transfer to the paper towel-lined plate, season with salt to taste and repeat to fry all of the sprouts.

Serve hot, with Paprika-Spiked Dipping Sauce for dipping.

NOTES: Because the eggs remain raw, use pasteurized eggs if you have food-safety concerns.

Make sure the sprouts are completely dry before frying. If any moisture remains, the hot oil will splash and sputter, and you risk burns. If the oil starts to pop, hold a large pan lid or splatter screen over the Dutch oven or skillet to contain the oil.


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Recipe Source

From Zach Patton and Clay Dunn, who blog at TheBittenWord.com.

Tested by Emily Parsons.

E-mail questions to the Food Section.

E-mail questions to the Food Section at food@washpost.com.

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Nutritional Facts

Ingredients are too variable for a meaningful analysis.

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