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The Washington Post

Spinach, Farro and Duck Confit Salad With Poached Egg

Spinach, Farro and Duck Confit Salad With Poached Egg 2.000

Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post; tableware from Crate and Barrel

Feb 26, 2014

Duck eggs add richness and elegance to this entree salad, fortified with nutty farro and earthy shiitake mushrooms and topped with a centerpiece of crisped duck leg confit.

Make Ahead: The farro and the eggs can be cooked a day in advance. Bring them to room temperature before serving.

Where to Buy: Buying pre-cooked duck confit legs saves time and effort. They are often found in butcher shops or the specialty meat sections of grocery stores. In Washington, certain Safeway and Giant stores carry them. They are also available online at www.dartagnan.com. Omit the eggs if you wish.


Servings:
2

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Tested size: 2 servings

Ingredients
  • For the eggs
  • 2 large duck eggs (may substitute chicken eggs)
  • 6 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon distilled white vinegar
  • For the salad
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup semi-pearled farro
  • Two 6-ounce, store-bought duck confit legs, such as D’Artagnan brand (see headnote)
  • 4 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced thick (2 cups)
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped shallot
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 ounces (4 cups packed) baby spinach leaves, stemmed, rinsed well and dried

Directions

For the eggs: Line a plate with paper towels. Fill a bowl with water and ice. Crack each egg into its own ramekin or small bowl.

Combine the water, salt and vinegar in a 3-quart saucepan over medium-high heat. Once small bubbles form at the edge of the water, reduce the heat to medium.

Hold each ramekin or bowl close to the water’s surface. Gently slip 1 egg, then the other, into the water, leaving plenty of space between them. Cook undisturbed for 30 seconds, then use the edge of a flexible spatula to make sure neither egg is sticking to the bottom of the pan. Use the spatula to bring the white up, over, and all around each yolk. Cook for 2 1/2 minutes to soft-poach them. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the eggs to the ice-water bath to stop their cooking, then transfer them to the lined plate to drain. Use a paring knife to trim the eggs into neat ovals.

At this point, if you’re not serving the salad right away, the eggs can be placed in an airtight container and refrigerated for up to 2 days.

For the salad: Combine the water, salt and farro in a medium saucepan; bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cook uncovered for 25 to 30 minutes or until the farro is tender. Drain in a colander, then rinse with cool running water and drain.

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Line a plate with paper towels. Have a baking dish at hand.

Place the duck legs skin side down in a saute pan over medium heat; cook until the skin crisps and releases easily, about 5 minutes. Transfer to the baking dish skin side down; bake to warm the meat through, about 10 minutes.

Remove all but 1 tablespoon of duck fat from the pan; reserve that fat for another use. Increase the heat to medium-high; add the mushrooms and stir to coat; cook until they begin to brown, about 2 minutes. Transfer them to a paper towel-lined plate.

Whisk together the shallot, mustard, vinegar, oil, salt and pepper in a large salad or mixing bowl. Add the spinach, farro and mushrooms to the bowl and dress them well.

Divide the salad between individual plates. Top each with a duck leg and a poached egg. Serve right away.

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Recipe Source

From Washington food writer David Hagedorn, co-author with chef Cathal Armstrong of "My Irish Table: Recipes From the Homeland and Restaurant Eve" (Ten Speed Press, March 2014).

Tested by David Hagedorn.

E-mail questions to the Food Section.

E-mail questions to the Food Section at food@washpost.com.

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Ingredients are too variable for a meaningful analysis.

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