Frances Stead Sellers

Senior writerWashington, D.C.

Latest

“Have a very Merry!” -- a form of metonymy, or simply nominalization?

  • Dec 25, 2014

The artist’s granddaughter will donate a print of “Snow Hill” to an elementary school, in honor of a student who died of cancer

  • Dec 19, 2014

At a party celebrating Saint Lucia, there’s smoked fish, glogg and a festive crowd.

  • Dec 12, 2014

The Library of Congress honored Billy Joel with the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song at at the DAR Constitution Hall Wednesday night.

  • Nov 20, 2014

London’s Science Museum opens a stunning exhibit devoted to the 6 networks that changed society.

  • Nov 13, 2014

The ambassador hosted a party for the folks who tried to keep the Leaning Tower of Pisa from toppling.

  • Nov 11, 2014

Most Americans want to quarantine healthcare workers returning from treating Ebola patients in West Africa. Does that make scientific sense?

  • Nov 4, 2014

Lewis Rubinson told himself that his fever was unlikely to be caused by Ebola. But for much of the time in the isolation unit, he only had himself to tell this to.

  • Nov 3, 2014

Queen Elizabeth II sent her first tweet at the opening of a new gallery at London’s Science Museum. But did she write it?

  • Oct 24, 2014

Weymouth talks about leading through change

  • Oct 15, 2014
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About
Frances Stead Sellers is senior writer at The Washington Post magazine. She joined the magazine in 2014 after spending two years as the editor of the daily Style section, with a focus on profiles, personalities, arts and ideas. Prior to that, Frances ran The Post’s Health, Science and Environmental coverage, including the battle over health reform, the Gulf oil spill and a series of stories about military medical care that was a Pulitzer finalist. She has also been deputy editor of Outlook. Frances came to The Post from Civilization, the bi-monthly magazine of the Library of Congress, which she helped launch in 1994 and which won a National Magazine Award for General Excellence in its first year of publication.
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