Jason Samenow

Weather editorWashington, D.C.

Latest

A cold front sweeping through the region this evening brings showers and some strong wind gusts. We dry out overnight and Wednesday.

  • Mar 31, 2015

The trendy explanation for the recent cold winters is that climate change made them worse.  But two new studies say not so fast.

  • Mar 31, 2015

As of the end of March, the snowpack is a startling 6 percent of normal, by far the lowest on record.

  • Mar 31, 2015

Maysak has peak winds of 160 mph, and has set several historical milestones for becoming so strong so early in the typhoon season.

  • Mar 31, 2015

Spring put on a glowing sunrise performance this morning.

  • Mar 31, 2015

In parts of South Carolina and Georgia this morning, the sky was transformed into a turbulent gray sea filled with massive, rolling waves

  • Mar 30, 2015

The Weather Channel’s aggressive ad campaign attempts to cast a spotlight on its live, real-time coverage compared to its competition.

  • Mar 30, 2015

Moving forward, we no longer see the potential for sustained cold and/or accumulating snow.

  • Mar 30, 2015

I’m stopping short of advertising a beautiful, warm week but, compared to previous weeks, it’s a step in the right direction.

  • Mar 30, 2015

OUTLOOK | We debunk misconceptions about the reliability of long-term forecasts and how “local” meteorology can get.

  • Jan 2, 2015
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About
A native Washingtonian, Jason Samenow has been a weather enthusiast since age 10 (1987) — the year of the “double whammy” snow storms that shut schools down seven straight days in the D.C. area. Before graduating from high school, he interned for NBC4 chief meteorologist Bob Ryan. At the University of Virginia, he earned a degree in environmental science, focusing in atmospheric science. He went on to earn a master’s degree in atmospheric science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2000.

Jason is currently the Washington Post’s weather editor. From 2000 to September 2010, he worked as a climate change analyst for the federal government, monitoring, analyzing and communicating the science of climate change. He founded CapitalWeather.com in early 2004, the first professional weather blog on the Internet which was absorbed by the Post in 2008.

Jason is a past chairman of the D.C. Chapter of the American Meteorological Society and a Weather and Society Integrated Studies Fellow. Jason lives with his wife, Deborah, and son, Evan in Washington, D.C.
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