Capitol Assets Scorecard

In a year-long series of stories, The Post has reviewed the overlap between Congress members’ personal finances and their legislative duties. Congress has forbidden top judges and administration officials from exerting official power in ways that affect their personal finances but has not applied similar rules to itself.

A look at the year of the Conflicts project
Source: Staff reporting and research. The Washington Post. Published on December 29, 2012, 3:46 p.m.

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In Congress, relatives lobby for bills before family members

In Congress, relatives lobby for bills before family members

Congress passed changes in 2007 limiting lobbying by their relatives but left a lot of room for the practice.

Capitol Assets: Congress’s wealthiest mostly shielded in deep     recession

Capitol Assets: Congress’s wealthiest mostly shielded in deep recession

A Washington Post investigation finds that, contrary to many popular perceptions, lawmakers don’t get rich by merely being in Congress. Rich people who go to Congress, though, keep getting richer while they’re there.

Graphic: How lawmakers handle their money

Graphic: How lawmakers handle their money

An in-depth, interactive look at the personal wealth of members of Congress - how they made it and how they handle their finances.

Congress members back legislation that could benefit     themselves, relatives

Congress members back legislation that could benefit themselves, relatives

Seventy-three members of Congress have pushed legislation in recent years that could benefit businesses or industries in which they or their family are involved or invested, according to a Washington Post analysis.

Congress’s financial winners and losers

Congress’s financial winners and losers

Most lawmakers — but not all — fared better than the average American in recent years.

Congressional ethics committees protect legislators, critics say

Congressional ethics committees protect legislators, critics say

Since 2004, ethics committees in Congress have moved to censure or reprimand just two lawmakers.

Gallery: The 25 wealthiest and 25 least wealthy members of Congress

Gallery: The 25 wealthiest and 25 least wealthy members of Congress

Here’s a look at the current members of Congress who had the highest and lowest estimated wealth in 2010, according to an analysis by the Center for Responsive Politics and The Washington Post.

Methodology: How The Post calculated congressional wealth

Methodology: How The Post calculated congressional wealth

Financial disclosures filed annually by each member were used to estimate the wealth of lawmakers for 2004 through 2010.

Members of Congress trade in companies while making laws that     affect those same firms

Members of Congress trade in companies while making laws that affect those same firms

One-hundred-thirty members of Congress or their families have traded hundreds of millions of dollars worth of stocks in companies lobbying on bills that came before their committees, a Washington Post analysis has found.

Lawmakers reworked financial portfolios after talks with Fed,     Treasury officials

Lawmakers reworked financial portfolios after talks with Fed, Treasury officials

At least 34 members of Congress recast their financial portfolios following phone calls or meetings with high-ranking Treasury Department and Federal Reserve officials during the economic crisis.

Lawmakers sell off stock in company included in Senate     investigation

Lawmakers sell off stock in company included in Senate investigation

Congress members face an appearance of a possible conflict of interest when in 2009 they sold off stock in GameStop, which was being investigated by the Senate.

Capitol Assets: Some legislators send millions to groups     connected to their relatives

Capitol Assets: Some legislators send millions to groups connected to their relatives

Some members of Congress send tax dollars to institutions where their spouses, children and parents work, according to an examination of federal disclosure forms and local public records by The Washington Post.

Congressional earmarks sometimes used to fund projects near     lawmakers' properties

Congressional earmarks sometimes used to fund projects near lawmakers' properties

EXCLUSIVE | Thirty-three members of Congress have steered more than $300 million in earmarks and other spending provisions to dozens of public projects that are next to or within about two miles of the lawmakers’ own property, according to a Washington Post investigation.

 
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