Federal employee bills show Capitol Hill’s partisan divide

(Astrid Riecken / EPA)

When it comes to federal employees, one party wants to give and the other wants to take away.

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              The Federal Diary

              Federal employee bills show Capitol Hill’s partisan divide

              epa04572225 US President Barack Obama delivers his 6th State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on the floor of the US House of Representatives in the US Capitol in Washington, DC, USA, 20 January 2015. EPA/ASTRID RIECKEN

              When it comes to federal employees, one party wants to give and the other wants to take away.

              High court protects federal whistleblowers

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              Fine Print

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              What’s more critical: A hot or cold war?

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              The High Court

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              On Friday, they agreed to hear arguments and set the table for what some see as a narrowed focus.

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              Will this be the term for same-sex marriage?

              A same-sex marriage supporter waves a rainbow flag in front of the US Supreme Court on March 26, 2013 in Washington, DC, as the Court takes up the issue of gay marriage. The US Supreme Court on Tuesday heard arguments on the emotionally charged issue of gay marriage as it considers arguments that it should make history and extend equal rights to same-sex couples. Waving US and rainbow flags, hundreds of gay marriage supporters braved the cold to rally outside the court along with a smaller group of opponents, some pushing strollers. Some slept outside in hopes of witnessing the historic hearing. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEBSAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

              Watchers are trying to determine if the Supreme Court will finally take up case.

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              McCain and his ‘illegitimate son,’ Lindsey Graham, now oppose closing Guantanamo

              McCain and his ‘illegitimate son,’ Lindsey Graham, now oppose closing Guantanamo

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              House Republicans propose shrinking federal workforce

              House Republicans propose shrinking federal workforce

              One bill would reduce the federal workforce by 10 percent through attrition and cut service contracts. Another would trim the defense civilian workforce by 15 percent.

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