IRS paid bonuses to tax-delinquent employees, report says

The IRS doled out more than $2.8 million to about workers with recent conduct issues including nonpayment of taxes, an inspector general said.

The Federal Eye

House members have ‘serious concerns’ about charity rules

A bipartisan group of House members has “substantial concerns” about new Obama administration rules for the Combined Federal Campaign.

Homeland Security considers new limits on deportations

EYE CATCHERS | Recommended stories from The Washington Post and across the Web.

Should the IRS regulate uncertified tax preparers?

The Government Accountability Office found “significant preparer errors” during undercover visits to 19 sites.

NEH to help vets with humanities program

The initiative is designed to help veterans using literature, drama and history.

Does Government Printing Office need a digital-era name?

A bipartisan bill would swap “printing” for “publishing” to better reflect the agency’s digital-age offerings.

The Federal Diary

IRS budget cuts mean lower tax collections, poor service

U.S. Department of the Treasury Internal Revenue Service 1040 Individual Income Tax forms for the 2011 tax year are arranged for a photograph in Tiskilwa, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, April 4, 2012. Automatic six-month extensions for filing tax returns are available to taxpayers using the Free File link on IRS.gov, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) said April 3. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

The cuts have led to fewer employees, less training, bad service and a drop in revenue.

Postal bill would cut workers comp across the government

Legislation would cut some payments provided through FECA for staffers injured on the job.

Retired fed celebrates 35 years with transplanted kidney

Tom Cooper has survived for 35 years as a kidney transplant patient. His brother donated a kidney to him at Vanderbilt which he has written a book 'Miracle at Exit Number 3'. (SUZANNE CARR ROSSI / THE FREE LANCE STAR) **MANDATORY CREDIT, NO NEWS SERVICE**

He received his brother’s kidney in 1979. Health insurance provided needed drugs others can’t afford.

In the Loop

Cory Booker, Hollywood leading man

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) returns to Los Angeles this week for a fundraiser.

Jed Bartlet joins public debate over sentencing reform

Played by Martin Sheen, “West Wing” character says the country’s goal should be to have a “justice system that avoids unnecessary incarceration and irresponsible spending.“

Moniz and McCarthy to throw first (and second?) pitch at Red Sox game

In honor of Earth Day, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz and EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will throw the first pitch(es) at Tuesday’s Red Sox-Yankees game.

Fine Print

Snowden seems to be showing a double standard

In talking to Putin about surveillance, the former NSA contractor drops the ball.

Taking not-so-friendly fire on the home front

Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Michael Barrett has gotten some tough criticism for his Hill testimony.

Fine Print: A fight over Apache helicopters

In this photo released by the U.S Army National Guard shows an AH-64D Apache Longbow with the South Carolina Army National Guard releasing flares during a test over Camp Tajo, Iraq, October 8, 2011. A Pentagon budget plan to strip the Army National Guard’s Apache attack helicopters from America’s citizen-soldiers doesn’t sit well with the newly-retired South Carolina National Guard general who commanded a chopper battalion and flew them for more than 1,500 hours. (AP Photo/U.S. Army National Guard, Tracci Dorgan)

The Pentagon wants to move them out of the National Guard, but some lawmakers object.

The High Court

High Court: Protest and proximity are central in case

Michael “Mookie” Moss takes on the Secret Service after an anti-Bush group was moved during a protest.

High Court: Religion and equal rights, a balancing act

A case involving a New Mexico photographer and a same-sex couple is headed to the justices.

The protests at the Supreme Court’s door

Police arrest demonstrators after they tore down a barricade and took to the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court building, on the anniversary of the Citizens United decision, in Washington, January 20, 2012. Under the banner 'Occupy the Courts,' organizers expect thousands of people to rally on Friday at 150 courthouses to mark the second anniversary of the Supreme Court ruling that protesters say allows unlimited corporate campaign donations. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst   (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CRIME LAW CIVIL UNREST)

Case challenges justices on just where demonstrators get to protest when it comes to the courts.

The Influence Industry

As Sen. Ron Wyden’s star rises, so does the state society’s

With lawmaker heading finance panel, suddenly state group gets a lot more attention from certain quarters.

Federal Player of the Week

Craig Saffoe: Managing the care of the National Zoo’s large cats

Craig Saffoe’sjob is managing the zoo’s lions, tigers and bears.

The Federal Coach

How to be positive and realistic, at the same time

An interview with psychologist and author Kathy Cramer.

When managers and employees disagree

Illustration for fa-socialmedia

There’s trouble when the gap is wide on issues central to job satisfaction, like promotions, training and work life balance.

Fixing what’s wrong with the IRS

“I’ve never dealt with an organization that is so short of resources across the board.”

Prospects

Job possibilities are growing again

In federal government, hiring is picking up; career-seekers must make an effort to keep pace.

Latest Federal News

Column

In the Loop: At White House, bunny’s identity is top secret

In the Loop: At White House, bunny’s identity is top secret

At White House Easter Egg roll, the name of person in bunny costume remains fuzzy.

Justices question law that criminalizes false speech

Justices question law that criminalizes false speech

The measure, which affects political candidates, raises constitutional doubts.

Supreme Court upholds Mich. ban on racial preferences

Supreme Court upholds Mich. ban on racial preferences

The 6 to 2 judgment could encourage other states to adopt similar bans on race-based college admissions.

Column

IRS budget cuts mean lower tax collections, poor service

IRS budget cuts mean lower tax collections, poor service

The cuts have led to fewer employees, less training, bad service and a drop in revenue.

How to be positive and realistic, at the same time

How to be positive and realistic, at the same time

An interview with psychologist and author Kathy Cramer.

Sotomayor: You can’t ‘wish away’ racial inequality

Sotomayor: You can’t ‘wish away’ racial inequality

Sotomayor’s impassioned dissent in affirmative action case draws a tart response from the chief justice.

House members have ‘serious concerns’ about charity rules

House members have ‘serious concerns’ about charity rules

A bipartisan group of House members has “substantial concerns” about new Obama administration rules for the Combined Federal Campaign.

Homeland Security considers new limits on deportations

Homeland Security considers new limits on deportations

EYE CATCHERS | Recommended stories from The Washington Post and across the Web.

Craig Saffoe: Managing the care of the National Zoo’s large cats

Craig Saffoe: Managing the care of the National Zoo’s large cats

Craig Saffoe’sjob is managing the zoo’s lions, tigers and bears.

High court’s decision on Aereo could reshape TV industry

High court’s decision on Aereo could reshape TV industry

This week, justices will hear a case that might affect how much it will cost to watch your favorite shows.

Court to determine what constitutes pomegranate juice

Court to determine what constitutes pomegranate juice

Justices to decide whether a product’s label must be based on its dominant contents.

Column

In the Loop: Bacardi tries to pack a political rum punch

The liquor firm’s PAC makes a point of bipartisan giving but forgets some details on its form.

Column

Snowden seems to be showing a double standard

In talking to Putin about surveillance, the former NSA contractor drops the ball.

Supreme Court to rule on use of Jerusalem in passports

Supreme Court to rule on use of Jerusalem in passports

Case will decide whether Congress or executive branch has final say on national sovereignty of the holy city.

Should the IRS regulate uncertified tax preparers?

Should the IRS regulate uncertified tax preparers?

The Government Accountability Office found “significant preparer errors” during undercover visits to 19 sites.

When managers and employees disagree

When managers and employees disagree

There’s trouble when the gap is wide on issues central to job satisfaction, like promotions, training and work life balance.

Lawmaker to try new strategy on Postal overhaul

Lawmaker to try new strategy on Postal overhaul

Rep. Darrell Issa plans a new bill he hopes will rally Democrats.

Column

Postal bill would cut workers comp across the government

Legislation would cut some payments provided through FECA for staffers injured on the job.

NEH to help vets with humanities program

NEH to help vets with humanities program

The initiative is designed to help veterans using literature, drama and history.

Does Government Printing Office need a digital-era name?

Does Government Printing Office need a digital-era name?

A bipartisan bill would swap “printing” for “publishing” to better reflect the agency’s digital-age offerings.

Lame ducks’ wings not yet clipped

Lame ducks’ wings not yet clipped

Three retiring members of Congress spent their recess traveling to South Asia and Europe.

Column

Retired fed celebrates 35 years with transplanted kidney

Retired fed celebrates 35 years with transplanted kidney

He received his brother’s kidney in 1979. Health insurance provided needed drugs others can’t afford.

Column

Putin believes he knows where to go for help

The Russian president trusts that a certain other president would save him if he were drowning.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says he lacks ‘sizzle’ for POTUS run

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says he lacks ‘sizzle’ for POTUS run

EYE CATCHERS | Recommended stories from The Washington Post and across the Web.

VA hospitals on par with private sector for patient satisfaction

VA hospitals on par with private sector for patient satisfaction

The American Customer Satisfaction Index shows the VA health network with scores equal to or better than the private sector.

Anti-gay-marriage lawyer plans daughter’s gay wedding

Anti-gay-marriage lawyer plans daughter’s gay wedding

Charles J. Cooper learned of his daughter’s sexual orientation during the legal battle over Proposition 8.

Feds talk: What are their top priorities for workplace changes?

Feds talk: What are their top priorities for workplace changes?

We asked federal employees in a recent survey to discuss their top priorities for changing the civil-service system.

Column

In the Loop: 2012 campaign may be over, but debt lingers

In the Loop: 2012 campaign may be over, but debt lingers

Some of the former Republican presidential hopefuls still must clear their campaign books.

What’s the future of your favorite federal program?

What’s the future of your favorite federal program?

Liberal think-tank Center for American Progress says Paul Ryan budget would decimate key services.

Conservatives not swayed by IRS plan to revise draft nonprofit rule

Conservatives not swayed by IRS plan to revise draft nonprofit rule

The IRS chief signaled that the his agency plans to re-write draft regulations limiting the political activities of tax-exempt groups.