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Immigration in the United States

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Senators unveil immigration reform plan — Jan. 28, 2013

A bipartisan group of senators outlined a sweeping proposal, on Jan. 28, 2013, to overhaul the nation’s immigration laws, saying the time has come to fix what they called “our broken immigration system.”

In a joint news conference, five of the eight senators introducing the plan portrayed it as an effort to resolve not only the plight of millions of illegal immigrants living in the shadows of society but to modernize and streamline the legal immigration system.

“We have a long way to go, but this bipartisan blueprint is a major breakthrough,” said Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.). He said the Senate could pass the bill by late spring or summer.

Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) vowed that the overhaul would not repeat “the mistakes of 1986,” when he said an amnesty program legalized millions of illegal immigrants but created conditions for the illegal entry of many millions more.

The other members of the eight who presented the proposal are Democrats Richard J. Durbin (Ill.), Robert Menendez (N.J.) and Michael F. Bennet (Colo.) and Republicans Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.), Marco Rubio (Fla.) and Jeff Flake (Ariz.).

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5 things to know on the AP-GfK immigration poll

Five things to know from the new Associated Press-GfK poll on immigration:

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Poll: Immigration concerns rise with tide of kids

(Eric Gay, Pool / Associated Press)

For nearly two months, images of immigrant children who have crossed the border without a parent, only to wind up in concrete holding cells once in the United States, have tugged at heartstrings. Yet most Americans now say U.S. law should be changed so they can be sent home quickly, without a deportation hearing.

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House Republicans propose plan to deal with border crisis

(J. Scott Applewhite / AP)

Proposal would give Obama administration much less emergency funding to confront problem.

Public shifts toward prioritizing deportation, poll shows

A majority say the government’s focus should be deporting and stopping illegal immigrants.

Nearly three quarters of Americans think the U.S. should shelter (not rush to deport) unaccompanied minors

It appears the American public isn’t nearly as comfortable sending unaccompanied minors back to Central America as the Republican party might hope.

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Obama mulls large-scale move on immigration

(File / Associated Press)

Even as they grapple with an immigration crisis at the border, White House officials are making plans to act before November’s mid-term elections to grant work permits to potentially millions of immigrants who are in this country illegally, allowing them to stay in the United States without threat of deportation, according to advocates and lawmakers in touch with the administration.

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Poll: Americans cool to border-crossing children

(Eric Gay, Pool / Associated Press)

Americans are wary of granting refugee status to children crossing the U.S. border to flee strife-torn countries in Central America, and most in an Associated Press-GfK poll say the U.S. does not have a moral obligation to accept asylum seekers generally.

 

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