National Digest: DNA helps in N.Y. cold case from 1991

October 8, 2013
NEW YORK
DNA leads to identity of dead child’s mom

In a dramatic break in a cold case more than two decades old, investigators used DNA to identify the mother of a dead child known only as Baby Hope, police said Tuesday.

The New York Police Department received a tip from someone after a publicity push during the summer, police officials said. The tip led to the woman, whose name is being withheld amid a homicide investigation.

The case dates to July 23, 1991, when a road worker smelled something rotting and discovered the girl’s remains inside a picnic cooler along the Henry Hudson Parkway.

The body of the girl, believed to be 3 to 5 years old, was unclothed and malnourished and showed signs of possible sexual abuse.

Her body was exhumed in 2007 for DNA testing, but none could be extracted because of its poor condition. After a second attempt was made in 2011 using better technology on bone material, a DNA profile was developed, police said.

— Associated Press

NEW MEXICO
Navajo Nation to stop
wild horse roundups

After talks with former New Mexico governor Bill Richardson (D), the Navajo Nation says it will end its wild horse roundups and reverse its public support for a return to domestic horse slaughter.

Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly said Tuesday that he met with Richardson during the weekend and that they agreed to work together to find more long-term and humane solutions to the horse overpopulation problem.

Richardson and actor Robert Redford created the Foundation to Protect New Mexico Wildlife this summer to fight efforts by a company in Roswell, N.M., and others to slaughter horses.

Shortly after the foundation was announced, the Navajo Nation came out in support of the company, saying it has 75,000 feral horses drinking wells dry and causing ecological damage to the drought-stricken range.

— Associated Press

Man, 89, pleads guilty to serving as drug mule: An 89-year-old Indiana man who grows lilies pleaded guilty Tuesday in Detroit to serving as a drug mule in a scheme to distribute more than 1,400 pounds of cocaine. Leo Sharp of Michigan City, Ind., a World War II veteran, is one of the oldest criminal defendants in Detroit’s federal court. He was 87 in 2011 when he was pulled over west of Detroit.

Inhofe recovering after heart surgery: Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) was recovering from emergency quadruple bypass heart surgery at home Tuesday in Tulsa but expects to return to Washington soon, he said. Inhofe, 78, had the surgery at a Tulsa hospital on Friday after doctors found a blockage during a routine visit. He was released from the hospital Tuesday afternoon, a spokeswoman said.

— From news services

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