The Big Story

Same Sex Marriage

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On June 26, 2013, the Supreme Court struck down a part of the Defense of Marriage Act, saying the federal ban on benefits to same-sex couples is unconstitutional; it also declined to rule on California’s Proposition 8, which defined marriage as between one man and one woman. A roundup of other recent articles on the topic of same -sex marriage and related issues.

Franklin Graham’s detestable anti-gay statements

He praises the autocratic Putin because President Obama believes gay Americans and their families should be treated with dignity and respect.

Helping the black family through gay marriage

More than 40 percent of lesbian and gay African Americans are raising children. Yet same-sex marriage is outlawed in six of the 10 states with the highest percentage of LGBT African Americans.

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Hundreds of same-sex couples wed in Michigan before appeals court issues stay

(Emma Fidel / AP)

But hundreds of gay couples said their vows after a Friday ruling struck down the state’s gay-marriage ban.

Why the political fight over same sex marriage is over, in 1 chart

It’s a little something called inter-generational change.

The state of the states on same-sex marriage, in 1 map

A one-stop shop to keep up on where the fight for same-sex marriage stands.

Cheat sheet: Gay marriage advances

Ever since the Supreme Court struck down the so-called Defense of Marriage Act, the lower federal courts have been busy.

Virginia is for all lovers

More confirmation that the new momentum in the marriage equality movement is coming from the unlikeliest of places: the South and West.

Cruz, Lee introduce ‘State Marriage Defense Act’

The bill would bring back many provisions invalidated by the overturn of DOMA last year.

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Race on same-sex marriage cases runs through Virginia

(Steve Helber / AP)

Lawyers are hopeful commonwealth cases will emerge as favored vehicles for a decision by the Supreme Court.

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A ‘veto’ attorneys general shouldn’t wield

(Steve Helber / AP)

Attorneys general can’t pick and choose which laws to defend.