The Washington Post

Yael Lehmann

(Jeffrey MacMillan/for The Washington Post)

Nearly one in three American children are overweight or obese. But after decades of rising rates, we may be turning a corner on the health crisis. Experts across fields gathered at Washington Post Live’s 2013 Childhood Obesity Summit to discuss strategies resulting in healthier children.

Yael Lehmann, Executive director, The Food Trust

We had staff going door to door and talking to different corner-store operators. Kids were going there two, three times a day and they were buying. For $1 they could buy four different items, and they were eating a lot of calories from the corner stores. In fact, we saw that the majority of the calories they were eating every day came from the corner store. Again, this happens a lot in urban and lower-income areas. These are in neighborhoods also where there may not be a great supermarket in the neighborhood. Most of the corner-store operators actually really care about the communities they operate in and they said, “As long as I don’t lose money, I’m into trying this.”


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