Next Day’s News: U.S. General killed in Kabul, Middle East latest, primaries and more

August 5, 2014

Here’s a look at tomorrow’s top talkers from Washington Post reporters and columnists who know the topics best.

ATTACK AT AFGHAN MILITARY ACADEMY: A two-star general was killed at a training academy in Kabul, according to media reports. The U.S.-led military coalition said numerous troops were wounded. Dan Lamothe and Pam Constable have the latest report.

MIDDLE EAST LATEST: Griff Witte and Sudarsan Raghavan report that Israel has withdrawn its ground forces from the Gaza Strip, part of a 72-hour cease-fire. Ishaan Tharoor looks at how during this conflict Israel appears to be losing support in Europe. The Post’s David Ignatius argues that it’s time for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to make peace in Gaza.

VOTERS HEAD TO THE POLLS: Voters in Kansas, Michigan, Missouri and Washington head to the polls today. The Fix’s Sean Sullivan provides the four biggest things to watch. A new Washington Post-ABC News poll shows that, for the first time ever, a majority of Americans disapprove of their own member of Congress.

TWO AMERICANS WITH EBOLA: The missionaries who contracted the disease in Africa are said to have improved after receiving a test serum, report Brady Dennis and Lenny Bernstein. Doses of the unproven treatment had made their way in frozen vials across the ocean and were administered to the two who had contracted Ebola. A PostEverything contributor said she interacted with hundreds of people during her most contagious period when she contracted an Ebola-like virus, which is why she does not fear an outbreak here. The Capital Weather Gang looks at whether climate change will worsen because of the outbreaks.

AFRICA SUMMIT: According to a report by Juliet Eilperin, President Obama announced Tuesday afternoon that private companies and government institutions are providing an additional $12 billion in aid to the administration’s electrification program for Africa, while the federal government is adding $300 million a year to the initiative. More than 70 percent of Africans lack a reliable electricity supply.

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