The Washington Post

How to best install diagonal bracing

Building codes have strict guidelines with respect to diagonal bracing. The code almost always dictates the type of nail, length, shape of the head, special coatings and so forth. The reason is simple: Diagonal bracing is critical to the structural stability of a building.

I’ve always found it best to install diagonal bracing for walls while the wall is built flat on a floor surface. With the wall on the ground, it’s easy to square it up. With the wall square on the ground, you can temporarily toenail the bottom and top plate so the wall doesn’t move while you nail on the plywood or oriented strand board at the corners.

You can also nail on the rest of the wall sheathing if you like. When you tilt the wall up, it’s already square — and you can move on to the next wall.

— Tim Carter


Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Show Comments
Most Read


Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Your Three. Videos curated for you.
Play Videos
Sleep advice you won't find in baby books
In defense of dads
Scenes from Brazil's Carajás Railway
Play Videos
For good coffee, sniff, slurp and spit
How to keep your child safe in the water
How your online data can get hijacked
Play Videos
How to avoid harmful chemicals in school supplies
Full disclosure: 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 ghoul
How much can one woman eat?
Play Videos
What you need to know about Legionnaires' disease
How to get organized for back to school
Pandas, from birth to milk to mom

To keep reading, please enter your email address.

You’ll also receive from The Washington Post:
  • A free 6-week digital subscription
  • Our daily newsletter in your inbox

Please enter a valid email address

I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Please indicate agreement.

Thank you.

Check your inbox. We’ve sent an email explaining how to set up an account and activate your free digital subscription.