Robert O’Harrow
Staff Writer

Robert O’Harrow Jr. is a reporter with the investigative unit of The Washington Post who has focused on privacy, national security, federal contracting and the financial world. In two decades at The Post, he has won multiple journalism awards. They include the 2013 Sigma Delta Chi Award for Zero Day, a series about cybersecurity and cyberwar, and a regional Emmy for a Zero Day video. O’Harrow previously won the top prize from Investigative Reporters and Editors for exposing fraud, waste and abuse in homeland security contracting. O’Harrow has been a Pulitzer Prize finalist twice, most recently in 2009 for a series of explanatory stories about the global financial crisis, and a four-time finalist for the Gerald Loeb Award for business writing. He is the author of the 2005 book “No Place to Hide,” about data profiling, surveillance and national security. He was co-producer of a radio documentary by the same name. In 2003, he won the Carnegie Mellon Cybersecurity Journalism Award.

Latest by Robert O’Harrow

Bush disclosure shows at least $9 million earned since January 2014

Bush disclosure shows at least $9 million earned since January 2014

How he earned it, according to his new financial disclosure: speeches, sitting on boards of directors and helping to manage private investment firms.

How Jeb Bush’s firm made him rich — and created a nest egg for his family

How Jeb Bush’s firm made him rich — and created a nest egg for his family

Tax disclosures provide first detailed look at the consulting business built by the former Florida governor.

Jeb Bush dogged by decades of questions about business deals

Jeb Bush dogged by decades of questions about business deals

Decades of records and interviews present a picture of a man who, before he became Florida governor, often benefited from his family connections and repeatedly put himself in situations that raised questions about his judgment.

Grassley clashes with police association over controversial asset seizures

Grassley clashes with police association over controversial asset seizures

Grassley is pushing to reform federal civil-asset forfeiture laws that allow police to take billions of dollars from people without filing charges or warrants.