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A more prosperous future for America’s heartland
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logoAmong the low-slung warehouses of Kokomo Indiana, a series of white and silver silos rise towards the sky. To visitors, Kokomo Grain could be just another landmark of the American Midwest.

To Indiana farmers, this grain elevator is much more. By innovating and investing in the future, Kokomo Grain is helping farmers to compete – and win – in the global economy of the 21st Century.

Soon after opening for business in 1950, Kokomo Grain became one of the first grain elevators in the Midwest to install a ‘unit train’ loading facility. This groundbreaking technology allowed Kokomo Grain to accommodate freight trains on site, load each train exclusively with grain, and send that grain from a single origin to a single destination maximizing efficiency.

Unit train freight rail service has reduced transportation costs and decreased shipping times – savings that have been passed along to Indiana’s farmers. According to Kokomo Grain CEO Scot Ortman, “The economies from volume shipping have allowed us to give farmers a better price for their grain. It’s money in their pockets and local communities and delivers real savings for millions of consumers who buy food, feed or fuel derived from our grains.”

Thanks in part to the competitive advantage provided by freight rail, today Kokomo Grain operates 10 grain elevators in two states, has increased storage capacity to 40 million bushels and has sales in excess of $425 million. With three unit train rail loading facilities in operation, Kokomo Grain continues to work closely with freight railroads to provide better service to Indiana farmers and deliver American commodities to market, more efficiently, affordably and safely than ever before. By investing in freight rail, Kokomo Grain is helping to reduce costs for Indiana’s farmers and realize a more prosperous future for America’s Heartland.

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A more prosperous future for Americas heartland
Sections
Advertisement
A more prosperous future for America’s heartland
By

Among the low-slung warehouses of Kokomo Indiana, a series of white and silver silos rise towards the sky. To visitors, Kokomo Grain could be just another landmark of the American Midwest. To Indiana farmers, this grain elevator is much more. By innovating and investing in the future, Kokomo Grain is helping farmers to compete – and win – in the global economy of the 21st Century.

Soon after opening for business in 1950, Kokomo Grain became one of the first grain elevators in the Midwest to install a “unit train” loading facility. This groundbreaking technology allowed Kokomo Grain to accommodate freight trains on site, load each train exclusively with grain, and send that grain from a single origin to a single destination maximizing efficiency

Unit train freight rail service has reduced transportation costs and decreased shipping times – savings that have been passed along to Indiana’s farmers. According to Kokomo Grain CEO Scot Ortman, “The economies from volume shipping have allowed us to give farmers a better price for their grain. It’s money in their pockets and local communities and delivers real savings for millions of consumers who buy food, feed or fuel derived from our grains.”

Thanks in part to the competitive advantage provided by freight rail, today Kokomo Grain operates 10 grain elevators in two states, has increased storage capacity to 40 million bushels and has sales in excess of $425 million. With three unit train rail loading facilities in operation, Kokomo Grain continues to work closely with freight railroads to provide better service to Indiana farmers and deliver American commodities to market, more efficiently, affordably and safely than ever before. By investing in freight rail, Kokomo Grain is helping to reduce costs for Indiana’s farmers and realize a more prosperous future for America’s Heartland.

Content From
More From Association of American Railroads
More From Association of American Railroads
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