China sends fighters to ID flights by U.S. and Japan in maritime air defense zone

November 29, 2013

The United States advised U.S. carriers to comply with China’s demand that it be told of any flights passing through its new maritime air defense identification zone over the East China Sea, an area where Beijing said it launched two fighter planes to investigate a dozen American and Japanese reconnaissance and military flights.

It was the first time since proclaiming the zone on Nov. 23 that China said it sent planes there on the same day as foreign military flights, although it said it merely identified the foreign planes and took no further action.

China announced last week that all aircraft entering the zone — a maritime area between China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan — must notify Chinese authorities beforehand and that it would take unspecified defensive measures against those that don’t comply. Neighboring countries and the United States have said they will not honor the new zone — believed aimed at claiming disputed territory — and have said it unnecessarily raises tensions.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said in a statement Friday that the United States remained deeply concerned about China’s declared air identification zone. But she said that it is advising U.S. air carriers abroad to comply with notification requirements issued by China.

In Beijing, the Ministry of Defense said the Chinese fighter jets identified and monitored the two U.S. reconnaissance aircraft and a mix of 10 Japanese early-warning, reconnaissance and fighter planes during their flights through the zone early Friday.

“China’s air force has faithfully carried out its mission and tasks, with China’s navy, since it was tasked with patrolling the East China Sea air defense identification zone. It monitored throughout the entire flights, made timely identification and ascertained the types” of planes, ministry spokesman Col. Shen Jinke said in a statement on the ministry’s Web site.

In Washington, a Pentagon spokesman, Army Col. Steve Warren, was asked about China’s statement and said, “The U.S. will continue to partner with our allies and will operate in the area as normal.”

— Associated Press

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