Turkey’s Erdogan rejects ‘dictator’ charges from protesters

June 2, 2013

Turkey’s prime minister on Sunday rejected claims that he is a “dictator,” dismissing protesters as an extremist fringe even as thousands returned to the landmark Istanbul square that has become the site of the fiercest anti-government outburst in years.

Over the past three days, protesters around the country have unleashed pent-up resentment against Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whom many Turks see as an uncompromising figure with undue influence in every part of life after 10 years in office.

A huge, exuberant protest in Taksim Square subsided overnight, but an estimated 10,000 people again streamed into the area Sunday, many waving flags, chanting, “Victory, victory, victory,” and calling on Erdogan’s government to resign.

Some protesters have compared Erdogan to a sultan and denounced him as a dictator. Scrambling to show he was unbowed and appealing to a large base of conservative Turks who support him, Erdogan delivered two speeches Sunday and appeared in a television interview.

With Turkish news media giving scant reports about the protests, many turned to social media outlets for information on the unrest.

“There is now a menace which is called Twitter,” Erdogan said. “The best examples of lies can be found there. To me, social media is the worst menace to society.”

Under Erdogan’s leadership, Turkey has boosted economic growth and raised its international profile. But he has been a divisive figure at home, with his government recently passing legislation curbing the sale of alcohol and taking a strong stand against Bashar al-Assad’s embattled Syrian regime, which some believe has put Turkey’s security at risk.

The demonstrations were ignited by a violent police crackdown on a peaceful sit-in to prevent the uprooting of trees at Taksim Square and have since spread around the country.

More skirmishes broke out in the capital, Ankara, on Sunday, with police unleashing tear gas at several thousand protesters who tried to march toward Erdogan’s office from the city’s main square.

A group of youths formed a barricade and hurled firebombs or threw gas canisters back at police. An Associated Press reporter saw at least eight injured people being carried away, and police appeared to target journalists with tear gas.

In Taksim, dozens of people climbed on the roof of a cultural center that Erdogan says will be demolished and turned into an opera hall. A banner reading “Don’t yield” was hung from the building.

“If they call someone who has served the people a ‘dictator,’ I have nothing to say,” Erdogan said in an address to a group representing migrants from the Balkans. “My only concern has been to serve my country.”

In another speech delivered an hour later, Erdogan said: “I am not the master of the people. Dictatorship does not run in my blood or in my character. I am the servant of the people.”

Police and protesters also clashed violently on Friday and Saturday, leaving hundreds injured. Clouds of tear gas overwhelmed Istanbul’s usually tourist-dominated city center.

Interior Minister Muammer Guler said about 1,750 people had been detained since Tuesday, but most had been released.

Erdogan called the protests “ideological” and manipulated by an opposition “unable to beat [the government] at the ballot box.”

He said 89 police vehicles, 42 private cars, four buses and 94 businesses were destroyed in the “vandalism” of the previous two days.

Alluding to his party’s strong base, Erdogan said he had the power to summon much larger numbers of supporters at rallies.

“Our supporters are calling and saying, ‘Are we going to stay silent?’ but I am urging calm,” he said in an interview with Haberturk television.

Erdogan reiterated that his government would not back off plans to uproot trees at Taksim as part of his urban renovation proposal for the area. In a statement that could cause more controversy, he also declared that a mosque would be built at Taksim.

The mosque plans have long been contentious because they would further shrink the green spaces in Istanbul’s city center. Some argue that there are plenty of mosques around the square.

Associated Press

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