Syria says it will allow U.N. to inspect site of suspected chemical weapons attacks

BEIRUT — U.N. inspectors will be allowed to access the locations of suspected chemical weapons attacks in the Damascus suburbs, Syrian state television said Sunday, a move that could provide independent verification of the events that unfolded last week.

In a statement, the U.N. said it was preparing to conduct on-site fact-finding activities starting Monday.

Video

There are unconfirmed reports that hundreds, including women and children, were killed by a chemical weapons attack outside Damascus, Syria.

There are unconfirmed reports that hundreds, including women and children, were killed by a chemical weapons attack outside Damascus, Syria.

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How chemical weapons work

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U.S. response to Syria chemical weapons

U.S. response to Syria chemical weapons

The Obama administration's strategy, not to mention domestic politics, point away from responding.

When has Syria used chemical weapons?

When has Syria used chemical weapons?

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Video of Syrian chemical survivor

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“The Government of the Syrian Arab Republic affirmed that it will provide the necessary cooperation, including the observance of the cessation of hostilities at the locations related to the incident,” the statement said.

“All relevant parties equally share the responsibility of cooperating in urgently generating a safe environment for the Mission to do its job efficiently.”

There has been mounting pressure on the Syrian government to allow access to the team of inspectors since activists accused the government of mounting a large scale attack on rebel-held areas on the outskirts of the capital.

Some 3,600 patients displaying neurotoxic symptoms were admitted to clinics and hospitals in less than three hours on Wednesday morning, Médecins Sans Frontières has said, of which 335 died. Some activist groups put the death toll at more than 1,000.

 
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