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Obituaries

Saturday, December 25, 2004; Page B07

Patricia Lockwood Public Affairs Specialist

Patricia Lockwood, 80, a retired Peace Corps public affairs information specialist who had a varied background in radio and television broadcasting, died of pneumonia Dec. 21 at Virginia Hospital Center. She lived in Arlington.

Ms. Lockwood was a native of Salinas, Calif., who attended the University of California at Berkeley before joining the Women's Army Corps in 1943.

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As part of her military service, she was sent to New York to help coordinate the Army's public relations and recruitment campaigns.

In 1960, she became creative director and partner in a private advertising firm in Spring Valley, N.Y. She also hosted a radio show in Peekskill, N.Y.

She joined the Peace Corps after retiring from advertising in 1975 and was sent to Malaysia to teach radio and television broadcasting. She was also hired as a United Nations development instructor for All India Radio in Bangalore.

When her Peace Corps service ended in 1979, she became assistant country director for the United Service Organization in Keflavik, Iceland. In 1981, she became USO country assistant director in Seoul, where she started a program to help Korean spouses of U.S. soldiers adjust to life in the United States.

Ms. Lockwood also taught drama at Kookmin University in Seoul and staged theatrical performances of American musicals throughout her years in the Peace Corps and USO.

She joined the Peace Corps headquarters in Washington as a public affairs information specialist in 1985 and retired four years later.

Her marriage to Hal Lockwood ended in divorce.

Survivors include a son, Randall Lockwood of Falls Church, and a granddaughter.

Oliver B. 'Davy' Crockett Sr. Sheet Metal Mechanic

Oliver B. "Davy" Crockett Sr., 90, a sheet metal mechanic who spent most of his career working on construction projects in the Washington area until retiring in 1978, died of pneumonia Dec. 23 at a hospital in Sayre, Pa.

Mr. Crockett lived in Sayre since July. He previously lived in Alexandria and Springfield for about 50 years.

He was a native of Richmond who moved to Washington in 1937 in search of work. As a member of Sheet Metal Workers Local 102, he worked on projects at the Pentagon and on Capitol Hill.

During World War II, he was drafted by the Army and served in Europe with Gen. George S. Patton's 89th Infantry Division, known as the "Rolling W."

His wife, Mary Virginia Cochran Crockett, died in 1986 after 50 years of marriage. A son, Thomas Reed Crockett, died in 1974.

Survivors include two children, O.B. "Buddy" Crockett Jr. of Sayre and Janis Voorhees of Columbia; a sister; three grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

Thomas F. Healy Army Lieutenant General

Thomas F. Healy, 73, an Army lieutenant general who retired in 1987 as chief of staff of Allied Forces Southern Europe in Naples, died of cancer Dec. 9 at Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg.

Gen. Healy, who lived in Fredericksburg for 17 years, was a native of Cambridge, Mass. An accomplished athlete in high school, he went on to graduate from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and obtain a master's degree in education from Columbia University.

He also attended the Armed Forces Staff College, the Command and General Staff College, the Army War College and the University of Heidelberg, Germany, where he studied German.

Gen. Healy, who taught German at the U.S. Military Academy for about three years in the early 1960s, served two tours of duty in Vietnam during the war there. He commanded the 5th Helicopter Battalion of the 7th Air Cavalry Division and was a member of the U.S. Military Assistance Command in Vietnam.

He later served in personnel and operations with the Army Department staff at the Pentagon, followed by staff positions with Allied Forces Central Europe and NATO Headquarters in Belgium.

He was commanding general of the 1st Armored Division in Ansbach, Germany, and commandant of the Army War College in Carlisle, Pa.

His military decorations include the Army Distinguished Service Medal, a Silver Star, three Legion of Merit medals and two Bronze Stars.

Survivors include his wife, Dordie Healy of Fredericksburg; two children, Lori K. Satchell of Cordova, Md., and Marc E. Healy of Harrisonburg, Va.; and four grandchildren.


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