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Voter Information for Tuesday's General Election

Thursday, October 28, 2004; Page DZ03

General election: Tuesday, Nov. 2.

Hours: 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Full coverage of races and winners in the Nov. 2 elections:
Results: D.C. | Maryland | Virginia
Washington in Red and Blue: Compare how area residents cast their votes in the 2000 and 2004 presidential elections.


Who can vote: Voters must have registered with the Board of Elections and Ethics by Oct. 4, 2004. They must be citizens of the United States, residents of D.C. and at least 18 years old by Election Day.

Where to vote: Check the Board of Elections and Ethics Web site at www.dcboee.orgor call (202) 727-2525.

What offices are on the ballot:

Electors for president and vice president of the United States.

Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives.

Two at-large seats on the D.C. Council.

D.C. Council seats for Wards 2, 4, 7 and 8.

United States representative (an unpaid lobbying post, commonly known as D.C. shadow representative).

District 1 member of the Board of Education, representing Wards 1 and 2.

District 2 member of the Board of Education, representing Wards 2 and 3.

Advisory neighborhood commissioner. There are 286 seats to be filled.

About Advisory Neighborhood Commission representatives: Members of the Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) each represent about 2,000 District residents. The city is divided into 286 single-member ANC districts. Some of the districts have few or no eligible voters, such as the district that covers the D.C. jail.

In 50 ANC districts, there is no official candidate, but voters may write in the name of any registered voter who has lived in the ANC district since at least Sept. 3, 2004, and holds no other public office. Seventy-four of the 286 seats are contested, and eight races have three candidates.

ANC representatives are unpaid and are elected for two-year terms. They represent the neighborhood and advise the District government on issues relating to zoning, social service programs, health, police protection, sanitation and recreation.


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