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A Swift Kick in the Sinn

There was even talk of an investigation of e-mail traffic to try to identify the leakers, but department officials couldn't confirm that.

Surely these folks have better things to worry about on the taxpayers' dime?

_____In the Loop_____
Treasury Has That Vacant Look (The Washington Post, Mar 14, 2005)
That '62 Sedan Was a Real Bomb (The Washington Post, Mar 11, 2005)
The U.N.'s Taller, So He's Moving Up (The Washington Post, Mar 9, 2005)
Free Speech Is Not for the Taking (The Washington Post, Mar 7, 2005)
Narcissus Is Now Greek AND Roman (The Washington Post, Mar 4, 2005)
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Friday's Question:
It was not until the early 20th century that the Senate enacted rules allowing members to end filibusters and unlimited debate. How many votes were required to invoke cloture when the Senate first adopted the rule in 1917?
51
60
64
67


Tenet Collecting Thoughts and Fees

We've been forgetting to remind folks not to look for former CIA director George J. Tenet's book on his CIA years anytime soon. Crown said in December it would publish the memoir -- bidding easily topped $4 million, the Associated Press reported -- and the book would appear toward the end of this year or early next.

But Tenet recently said he is postponing the effort and needs more time to reflect.

"An undertaking of such historical consequence simply requires more time" for research and "the necessary perspective," Tenet said. Historic, indeed.

He'll have to live, in the meantime, on the huge bucks he's making in speaking fees.

Yes, There's Life After State, NHTSA, Senate

Moves of note . . . Mitchell B. Reiss, former dean of international studies at the College of William and Mary and more recently head of policy planning at the State Department during the Powell era, is heading back to the school to be vice provost for international affairs. Reiss is also President Bush's special envoy for Northern Ireland.

Kenneth N. Weinstein, top attorney for enforcement at the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, has retired and headed to Mayer Brown Rowe & Maw, where other former top NHTSA officials have made a home.

On the Hill, Jeffrey F. Squires, who has been the lead staffer on the highway bill for the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee's ranking minority member, James M. Jeffords (I-Vt.), is heading private, going to be vice president for transportation program development at Parsons Corp., a transportation, infrastructure, communications conglomerate.


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